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Revenge Of The Tariffs
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Revenge Of The Tariffs

Podcast

Revenge Of The Tariffs

tires for sale in china. i

U.S. tire workers say Chinese tires like these are threatening their jobs. Liu Jin/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Liu Jin/AFP/Getty Images
tires for sale in china.

U.S. tire workers say Chinese tires like these are threatening their jobs.

Liu Jin/AFP/Getty Images
Revenge Of The Tariffs
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On today's Planet Money:

Right now there is someone out there writing a new line in the Harmonized Tariff Schedule, a 35 percent tariff on Chinese tires. President Obama announced the new tariff last week, angering the Chinese, who quickly responded with promises to investigate tariffs for the U.S. poultry and automotive industry.

The tariff tussle has sparked fears of trade war between the United States and China. Arvind Subramanian, economist at the Peterson Institute, says the new tariff may add to messy trade relations, but it will have little impact on the marketplace. That's good news for poultry distributor Eric Joiner who says he depends on China for sales of his chicken paws.

Bonus: A Planet Money radio roundup.

Download the podcast; or subscribe. Intro music: Archie Bronson's "Dead Funny." Find us: Twitter/ Facebook/ Flickr.

We've been all over the radio this week, but just in case you missed us, here are some links to this week's Planet Money stories:

China, U.S. At Odds Over Tariffs

Economists Debate 'Public Option' On Health Care

Money, Power Serve Up Alphabet Soup Of Regulators

Wall Street, One Year After Lehman Brothers

Consensus On Fixing Financial System Erodes

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