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Podcast: Should Government Run Our Health Insurance?

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Podcast: Should Government Run Our Health Insurance?

Podcast

Podcast: Should Government Run Our Health Insurance?

In San Francisco, the Cadillac plan. Steve Rhodes/Planet Money Flickr pool hide caption

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Steve Rhodes/Planet Money Flickr pool

Podcast: Should Government Run Our Health Insurance?

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/113357012/127424830" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

On today's Planet Money:

The U.S. Senate Finance Committee twice voted down a measure to have the government offer a health insurance plan — the so-called public option. In countries like England and Canada, the public option is a fact of life. Taxpayers put money into the system and everyone automatically gets health insurance from the government, in what's known as a single-payer system.

Should the government run our health insurance? Donna Smith of the California Nurses Association says it should. Smith, whose personal insurance nightmare figures in the Michael Moore documentary Sicko, says a single-payer system would get care to more people and save money.

Stuart Butler of the Heritage Foundation says government shouldn't become everyone's insurance company. Butler, who's from the U.K., says single-payer care is no cure-all.

Bonus: After the jump, two videos — one for socialized medicine, and one against it.

Download the podcast; or subscribe. Intro music: The Feelies' "Let's Go." Find us: Twitter/ Facebook/ Flickr.

Y'all sort this out in the comments, OK?

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First up, Andy Lubershane's "Why We Need Government-Run Universal Socialized Health Insurance:

Second, How the World Works' response: