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Podcast: The Economics Of Parenting

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Podcast: The Economics Of Parenting

Podcast: The Economics Of Parenting

Worth it. Elemenous/Flickr Creative Commons hide caption

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Elemenous/Flickr Creative Commons

Worth it.

Elemenous/Flickr Creative Commons

Podcast: The Economics Of Parenting

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/113584468/127424423" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

On today's Planet Money:

Human beings have always loved their children, but at certain times in history they really needed them, for financial reasons.

Mick Watson, chair of the psychology department at Brandeis University, explains how economics has impacted parenting styles from our early hunter-gatherer days to today's modern industrial society.

These days parents don't have a strict economic need to have children. Some values, he says, can't be measured in dollars and cents.

Bonus: Loving the health care in Australia.

Download the podcast; or subscribe. Intro music: Sia's "Day Too Soon." Find us: Twitter/ Facebook/ Flickr.

Graham Gordon writes:

I've been meaning to write since you first asked for confusing insurance bills. Then I again thought I should drop you a line when you asked "if I could have the insurance of any country where would it be?" I suppose it is better late than never.

My wife and I recently moved to Australia. We didn't move for the insurance, but Australia has insurance that is better than any country that I know of. Here there is a mix of public and private insurance. Everyone is covered by Medicare, and in addition you can purchase private health cover.

Soon after arriving here I found a doctor that I really like and have not had any trouble seeing him. I called just the other day and was offered appointments as early as two days later.

I haven't paid much attention to the bills I have been given, because all the care I have received so far, including blood work, specialist visits, and even some minor surgery has been completely covered.

When I did go in for the surgery the staff was fantastic. Everyone was very concerned about my comfort and making sure all my questions were answered. The night after my surgery a nurse called to check up, answer any questions I had, and make sure I was pleased with my care.

I have written letters to all my congresspeople urging them to look to Australia as a model for how good the US system could be.