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Round Room, No Windows

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Round Room, No Windows

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Round Room, No Windows

The Bank for International Settlements: the Basel Committee's cylindrical home. Sebastien Bozon/AFP hide caption

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Sebastien Bozon/AFP

Round Room, No Windows

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The Basel Committee On Banking Supervision meets in in round, windowless rooms in a tower in Basel, Switzerland. Its decisions play a huge role in the global financial system. Its meetings are closed to the public, and don't get much attention in the popular press.

On today's Planet Money, we talk to people who've been inside those rooms. And we unpack the latest Basel rules — regulations that are supposed to apply to banks around the world, and that are due later this year.

(Spoiler alert: They'll probably make the system safer. But they won't end financial crises.)

For more, read our Basel post from Friday. And see these reports from the Basel Committee and the Institute of International Finance, an industry group.

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