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The Tuesday Podcast: A Big Bridge In The Wrong Place

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The Tuesday Podcast: A Big Bridge In The Wrong Place

Government

The Tuesday Podcast: A Big Bridge In The Wrong Place

The Tuesday Podcast: A Big Bridge In The Wrong Place

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/139276566/139334413" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

The Tappan Zee Bridge in New York Stuart Ramson/AP hide caption

toggle caption Stuart Ramson/AP

You would never look at a map of the Hudson River, point to the spot where the Tappan Zee Bridge is, and say, "Put the bridge here!"

The Tappan-Zee crosses one of the widest points on the Hudson — the bridge is more than three miles long. And if you go just a few miles south, the river gets much narrower.

Our question for today's show: Why did they build a three-mile-long bridge when they could have built a much shorter, cheaper bridge nearby?

Our search for an answer leads us to a forensic engineer, the Statue of Liberty, and a governor who wanted to be an opera singer.

Subscribe to the podcast. Music: Chris Pureka's "Burning Bridges." Find us: Twitter/ Facebook.

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