Who Loaned Money To Greece, Anyway? : Planet Money We found a guy — a hedge fund manager who bought Greek bonds. He explains why working out a deal on Greek debt is so complicated.
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Who Loaned Money To Greece, Anyway?

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Who Loaned Money To Greece, Anyway?

Who Loaned Money To Greece, Anyway?

Who Loaned Money To Greece, Anyway?

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/145757370/145812509" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
Not going to get his money back.
Sang Tan/AP

It's the 11th hour for Europe's debt crisis. Again.

Greece still can't pay back all the money it owes. So it's trying to cut a deal with its creditors. (Again.)

We've been wondering for years: Who are the people who loaned money to Greece? Are they suckers? Brilliant investors?

On today's podcast we find someone who loaned Greece money: Hans Humes. He runs a hedge fund called Greylock Capital Management. Turns out, his office is just a few blocks away from ours.

Humes is one of the guys trying to hammer out a deal with Greece. He explains just how complicated the negotiations are — and how, even among people who loaned Greece money, there are huge divisions.

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