Episode 394: Why Taxpayers Pay For Farmers' Insurance : Planet Money On today's show, we travel to Fairbury, Illinois. We meet three generations of farmers who tell us that, even without crop insurance, their farms would survive the drought.
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Episode 394: Why Taxpayers Pay For Farmers' Insurance

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Episode 394: Why Taxpayers Pay For Farmers' Insurance

Episode 394: Why Taxpayers Pay For Farmers' Insurance

Episode 394: Why Taxpayers Pay For Farmers' Insurance

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/158787593/158808334" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
Corn in a time of drought.
AP

In spite of the drought, many U.S. farmers will do just fine this year. They are, after all, covered by crop insurance — a program that costs U.S. taxpayers $7 billion a year.

On today's show, we travel to Fairbury, Illinois. We meet three generations of farmers who tell us that, even without government-subsidized crop insurance, their farms would survive the drought.

So why does the government spend so much on crop insurance programs? We talk to an ag economist who has a surprising answer.

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