Episode 601: The Chocolate Curse : Planet Money The world is running out of chocolate. But a plant scientist in Ecuador has come up with a solution. But if you love chocolate, you might not like it.
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Episode 601: The Chocolate Curse

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Episode 601: The Chocolate Curse

Episode 601: The Chocolate Curse

Episode 601: The Chocolate Curse

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/383830776/383908031" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A new breed of cocoa: CCN-51 Stacey Vanek Smith/NPR hide caption

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Stacey Vanek Smith/NPR

A new breed of cocoa: CCN-51

Stacey Vanek Smith/NPR

The world is running out of chocolate.

Cocoa is in short supply. Demand is way up, thanks to China and India developing a taste for the sweet stuff. Producing more cocoa isn't so easy. Cocoa is a fussy plant. It doesn't grow in very many places and it gets diseases really easily.

Today on the show, we learn about one man in Ecuador who came up with an answer to the global cocoa shortage. A warning here; if you're a die-hard chocolate lover, you might not like it.

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