NPR logo
Episode 609: The Curse Of The Black Lotus
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/392381112/392408842" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Episode 609: The Curse Of The Black Lotus

Podcast

Episode 609: The Curse Of The Black Lotus

Episode 609: The Curse Of The Black Lotus
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/392381112/392408842" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Save this episode to Stitcher: Listen to this later on Stitcher
A mint condition Black Lotus sells for $25,000. i

A mint condition Black Lotus sells for $25,000. Jim Bruso hide caption

toggle caption Jim Bruso
A mint condition Black Lotus sells for $25,000.

A mint condition Black Lotus sells for $25,000.

Jim Bruso

In a classic bubble — housing for example, or tech stocks or Beanie Babies — the fun ends in a crash. Things go belly up, and people can lose a lot of money.

The creators of the collectible card game Magic: The Gathering faced such a bubble. The cooler they made their cards, the more the resale value increased — and threatened to send Magic cards the way of the Beanie Baby.

Today on the show: how the folks who made Magic cards came up with a plan. A plan to once and for all conquer the science of bubbles, and make a collectible toy that could live forever.

Music: Grapes's "I dunno" and Jessie J's "Price Tag." Find us: Twitter/ Facebook/ Spotify/ Tumblr.

Comments

 

Please keep your community civil. All comments must follow the NPR.org Community rules and terms of use, and will be moderated prior to posting. NPR reserves the right to use the comments we receive, in whole or in part, and to use the commenter's name and location, in any medium. See also the Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Community FAQ.