NPR logo

Episode 399: Can You Patent A Steak?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/401491625/401534052" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Episode 399: Can You Patent A Steak?

Podcast

Episode 399: Can You Patent A Steak?

Episode 399: Can You Patent A Steak?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/401491625/401534052" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Save this episode to Stitcher: Listen to this later on Stitcher
Eugene Gagliardi, inventor of Steak-Umm
Joshua Marston

Tony Mata is a meat inventor. Obviously, he didn't invent meat; his job is figuring out new things to do with it.

Mata thinks he discovered a new steakā€”a novel way to cut up a chunk of beef that's currently not worth much. He's so excited about his discovery that he's trying to patent it.

Today on the show: can you patent a steak? We visit the workshop of Gene Gagliardi, the inventor of Steak-Umm and KFC's popcorn chicken. And we try to figure out what meat inventors tell us about patents and innovation.

More from Planet Money:

* Video: It's Not Just A Guy Cutting Chicken. It's A Patent.

* In The Kitchen With The Inventor Of Steak-Umm

Note: Today's show is a rerun. It originally ran in August 2012.

Music: Fields of Ohio's "Anti-Saloon League Midnight Mystery" and Cold Specks' "Blank Maps." Find us: Twitter/ Facebook/ Spotify/ Tumblr.

We no longer support commenting on NPR.org stories, but you can find us every day on Facebook, Twitter, email, and many other platforms. Learn more or contact us.