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Episode 661: The Less Deadly Catch
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Episode 661: The Less Deadly Catch

Jobs

Episode 661: The Less Deadly Catch

Episode 661: The Less Deadly Catch
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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/454698093/454751869" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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Alaskan fisherman David Fry and his baited hooks. i

Alaskan fisherman David Fry and his baited hooks. Jess Jiang/NPR hide caption

toggle caption Jess Jiang/NPR
Alaskan fisherman David Fry and his baited hooks.

Alaskan fisherman David Fry and his baited hooks.

Jess Jiang/NPR

Halibut fishermen in Alaska used to defy storms, exhaustion and good judgment. That's because they could only fish in these handful of 24-hour periods. It was called the derby, and the derby made fishing the deadliest job in America.

Today on the show, the economic fix that made fishing safer. And why a lot of people hate it.

On the show we introduce you to David Fry, the owner of the Realist halibut boat.

Note: This episode contains explicit language.

Gutted halibut.

Gutted halibut. Jess Jiang/NPR hide caption

toggle caption Jess Jiang/NPR
David Fry holds a hook, hoping for some halibut.

David Fry holds a hook, hoping for some halibut. Jess Jiang/NPR hide caption

toggle caption Jess Jiang/NPR

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