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Episode 663: Money Trees
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Episode 663: Money Trees

The Rain Forest Was Here

Episode 663: Money Trees

Episode 663: Money Trees
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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/455941812/455951673" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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These self-described "Guardians of the Forest" live on protected reserves in the Brazilian state of Rondonia.
Kainaz Amaria/NPR

When NPR's reporting team traveled deep into the Amazon rain forest to report on the environment, they took planes, a truck, and a motorcycle. Lots of fuel was burned. Lots of carbon was emitted. They felt guilty. In the process of reporting on the environment, were they making the problem worse?

So they came to the Planet Money team with a question: What can we do about it?

There's this one option. They can pay a little money and the fossil fuel pumped into the atmosphere can somehow go away. Carbon offsets have been around a long time. Long enough to know if they actually work. Today on the show: We investigate carbon offsets.

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