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Episode 708: Bitcoin Divided

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Episode 708: Bitcoin Divided

Podcast

Episode 708: Bitcoin Divided

Episode 708: Bitcoin Divided

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/484029238/484036301" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
PHILIPPE LOPEZ/AFP/Getty Images
China has become the center of the Bitcoin world.
PHILIPPE LOPEZ/AFP/Getty Images

Bitcoin was supposed to be the currency of the future: secure, fast, independent of any government. But if there's one feature a currency needs, it's to let you pay for things. And, recently, that's been a problem for Bitcoin.

The idea was always that when technical problems arose, the bitcoin community would come together to solve things. But that hasn't happened. In fact, behind the scenes, a kind of civil war has broken out.


For more, read Nathaniel Popper's companion piece in the New York Times. You can also read his book, Digital Gold.

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