Episode 713: Paying for the Crime : Planet Money A tale of violence, payback, and how to make things right.
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Episode 713: Paying for the Crime

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Episode 713: Paying for the Crime

Episode 713: Paying for the Crime

Episode 713: Paying for the Crime

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/486785422/486810271" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Scott Olson/Getty Images
Darrell Cannon was tortured into confessing to a crime he didn't commit and was sentenced to life in prison. He was exonerated in 2004 and released from prison in 2007
Scott Olson/Getty Images

* Note: This episode has depictions of violence and explicit language.

On November 2nd, 1983, Darrell Cannon was awoken by a pounding on his door. It was the Chicago police. They told him he was a suspect in a murder case, and they wanted him to confess that he was involved. When he didn't confess, the cops put him a car, drove him to a rural site, and tortured him. Darrell gave a confession that would land him in prison for more than 20 years.

And Darrell's torture: It was not an isolated incident. A group of Chicago police officers tortured confessions out of some 118 suspects over a span of 20 years. Years later, Chicago has offered the victims a reparations package - in the form of an apology, acknowledgement, counseling, a memorial. And some money.

Today on the show: Darrell Cannon's story: a tale of violence, payback, and how to make things right.

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