Twenty-Five Things That Are Easier To Get Rid Of Than Brett Favre

Brett Favre discusses his decision to join the Minnesota Vikings.

Brett Favre has now unretired for the second time after retiring for the second time. He's harder to get rid of than many other things you would think would be hard to get rid of. Scott A. Schneider/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Scott A. Schneider/Getty Images

Yes, Brett Favre unretired. Again. Just like he did last year. We can think of nothing to say anymore except that Brett Favre is harder to get rid of than almost anything. He is harder to get rid of, even, than these 25 things.

1. Your garden's extra zucchini
2. Bedbugs wearing chain mail
3. Medically significant dandruff
4. Old couch stuffed with burning tires
5. Weird feeling that you left the iron on at home
6. Athlete's foot (exception: Brett Favre's foot)
7. Contents of huge cabinet marked "DOT-MATRIX PRINTERS (BROKEN)"
8. Movie rights to Roget's Thesaurus
9. Any tavern's friendliest drunk
10. Mustard stain on favorite shirt
11. Streaks of jelly in jar of peanut butter
12. Streaks of peanut butter in jar of jelly
13. Microsoft Word's helpful "Clippy"
14. Dark curse placed by toothless goblin during carnival mishap
15. Six-foot sphere of wadded trash bags thrown into landfill
16. Troupe of professional gadflies
17. Mall kiosk lotion demonstrator
18. Ads where guy sings about credit reporting
19. All those pennies
20. General sense that salmon was once cooked in this pan
21. Box of VHS tapes of Mr. Belvedere
22. Inherited record-breaking fruitcake collection
23. Yellowjacket nest guarded by family of armed raccoons
24. $50 gift card from Expired Food Depot
25. All lingering affection for Brett Favre

[Note: Of course famous athletes are pop culture, silly.]



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