Home Video

'Up' Again ... So Worth It

Russell and Mr. Fredrickson in 'Up.'.

If you're not ready to see Up a lot of times, you'd better not buy the rather fantastic home video version. Walt Disney Pictures hide caption

toggle caption Walt Disney Pictures

When I got my copy of the Blu-ray combo pack that includes Up on Blu-ray and on DVD — and includes a digital copy for your computer or whatever other sort of device to boot — I happened to be hanging out with the same five-year-old and eight-year-old I saw it with in theaters, so we popped it into the player. The five-year-old even abandoned Spongebob to come watch it, and that is a big, big deal. This, I figured, was a great test. They'd loved it the first time, but would it hold up?

Up has completely stopped being good, after the jump. Just kidding.

All of us laughed just as hard the second time around, and I still sniffled through the opening to the point where I had to skitter off to the kitchen so they wouldn't notice me crying and ask me to explain about the lady who can't have a baby.

I assume it's not necessary to sell the movie to you again — and I shouldn't forget Partly Cloudy, the glorious short that aired with Up in theaters and is also included, and I loved that just as much the second time, too.

Fortunately, they've packed the discs with lots of other goodies.

The Blu-ray, in particular, has a sort of souped-up director's commentary, where you get little sketches and other visuals popping up in boxes on the screen to illustrate what the people are talking about, and some great supporting material including a long film about the trips to South America that allowed the visuals to be so powerful, a new short starring Dug the dog ("Squirrel!"), and a few sketches that illuminate alternate endings that were considered for the "villain" Muntz.

It's not big news, I don't think, that Up still makes for pretty great home entertainment, or that it looks tremendous — seriously, it looks tremendous — especially on Blu-ray or on a great TV, where the colors really pop and the animation looks glorious. But even if you're just plugging it into your completely pedestrian DVD player and your fifteen-year-old living-room television, it's going to be watched over and over, in all likelihood, so don't buy it if you're not ready to see it a few times. Bring tissues.



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