A 'Moby-Dick' Update: We Are Enjoying Queequeg And Long Sentences

whale tail.

I thought I would give a quick update on the Moby-Dick project that is the latest undertaking of the I Will If You Will Book Club.

These mighty book-huggers have taken to Twitter and our #monkeyread hashtag to share their early impressions and their thoughts on tackling the book. A small sampling:

From @poetsonline: "I reread Moby Dick every spring to prevent knocking off people's hats."

From our trusty comics blogger Glen Weldon: "The same week I, a husky bald pale dude, returns to lap swimming, #monkeyread happens to choose Moby Dick. Okay, universe. I GET it."

From @AiDaAw: "Ok NPR. I started Moby Dick (very cool challenge) but I am afraid I am siding with the animal at this point. Whaling. So cruel." [I cannot disagree, but I'm less than, like, a million pages into the book, so I have yet to SEE a whale.]

From @akbutler: "Pleasantly surprised that this book is so funny. Humor reminds me a little of Twain." [I had this reaction also — not specific to Twain, but funnier than I expected.]

From @SmoTheScholar: "Ch.1 down, which is more than I can say for the time I tried to read it in American Lit."

From @jdoublep18: "Does anyone else almost feel like you have homework you're putting off when you watch TV instead of reading Moby Dick?"

From @Kaylen_M: "Finished Chapter 1 of Moby Dick. Must remember to leave breadcrumb trail to get through the maze of words."

From @timtastic74: "Chapter 3 of 'Moby Dick' is eerily similar to my first night in a dorm room."

From @fae_kae: "Chapter 4 of 'Moby-Dick' should be called 'Ishmael's Walk of Shame.'"

From @doyennedesserts: "'Queequeg was George Washington cannibalistically developed.' I will forever use '_____ was _____cannibalistically developed.'"

Happily, there are lots and lots more, both contemplative and funny, where those came from.

On Thursday, we will reconvene to discuss the first ten chapters. Mild spoiler alert: as some of these tweets are hinting, you may be surprised at how much of those first ten chapters are about cuddling, if you expect the book to be about whales. Juuuuust saying.

Meanwhile, consider this interesting tidbit: If you buy Moby-Dick for your iPad, you may find that the blurb is missing something.



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