Roundups

Morning Shots: Thrill To The Wild Spectacle Of The Grammy Nominations!

a cup of coffee
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I'm as intrigued as anyone by the theoretical notion that Lost's Josh Holloway would make a fine Jim Rockford if we absolutely must redo The Rockford Files, but I'm not sure what it is about "name mentioned by someone somewhere who may or may not have anything to do with casting; absolutely no discussions being had with anyone" that qualifies as "scoop." If there ever is any actual "scoop" on this, I'll be the first to enthusiastically sign on.

The Grammy nominations will be announced on December 1, in a TV special that will not be watched by very many people, if history is any guide. NPR Music's own Stephen Thompson and I will have to negotiate over whether we can bear to cover them again.

I love the sheer audacity (by which I mean "ridiculousness") of this project, where a guy saw 100 movies in 100 days in theaters around the country. (via Cinematical)

Remember Old Spicy and his personal greetings to many people, including me? Remember how everybody said, "Oh, sure, it gets attention, but this campaign isn't going to sell any soap"? Old Spice body wash sales have increased 55 percent in the last three months.

James Patterson — or, rather, the team of authors that goes by the name "James Patterson" — is behind one out of every 17 novels purchased in the U.S., according to The Guardian. Yipes.

It took a while, but American Idol runner-up Justin Guarini — that's Justin Guarini of the very first season — will show up on Broadway, the surprise destination of so many Idol high achievers, in Women On The Verge Of A Nervous Breakdown, alongside, um, Patti LuPone. So he's doing all right.

And finally, as you know, we closely follow the whole e-book phenomenon around here, and I can happily recommend this piece from Linton Weeks, succinctly and correctly called, "Books Have Many Futures." Hear, hear.

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