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The Headline From NY Fashion Week: Print(s) Is Not Dead

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The Headline From NY Fashion Week: Print(s) Is Not Dead

The Headline From NY Fashion Week: Print(s) Is Not Dead

The Headline From NY Fashion Week: Print(s) Is Not Dead

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/140480250/140490588" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Today's the last day of New York Fashion Week, that twice-yearly ritual at which retailers and editors give us a look at what we're going to be craving in spring. Big this year: prints. Whimsical prints.

To get a bead on what looks like a swing back away from minimalism, Morning Edition guest host David Greene talks to Sally Singer, editor-in-chief of T: The New York Times Style Magazine.

"A woman only needs so many pairs of chic black pants," Singer says. "Or so many cream jackets. What does she need now? She needs a dress covered in birds — or that's what the [retailers] hope."

There's more on that — and on how the urge to stay fashion-forward might conflict with fears that the economy might soon be moving in reverse — in the audio above.

And in that photo gallery, courtesy of my colleague Nina Gregory out at NPR West, there's just shy of a dozen examples of work from designers Singer says are addressing a whole new generation of fashionistas — and who have "the capacity and the drive" to be the next gang of Tommys and Calvins and Ralphs.

Go on, look at 'em full-screen. You know you wanna.

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