Stefanie Drootin-Senseny and Chris Senseny are the core of Big Harp, a band the married couple formed shortly after the birth of their second child. Ryan Fox/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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A Married Duo Chases The Dream, Toddlers In Tow
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Over a quarter century, Naxos Records has evolved from an industry joke to a leading force in classical music. Naxos hide caption

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Naxos: The Little Record Label That Could (And Did)
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Bob Dylan in 1962. His extremely limited-edition 50th Anniversary Collection features unreleased material from his early career. John Cohen/Getty Images hide caption

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Why There Are Only 100 Copies Of The New Bob Dylan Record
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Conductor Simon Rattle, who has reportedly told the Berlin Philharmonic he will leave his post there in 2018. Thomas Rabsch/courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Herbie Hancock speaks with the current class of Thelonious Monk Institute of Jazz Performance masters degree students. Chip Latshaw/UCLA hide caption

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Rapper Amkoullel had one of his songs banned by Mali's government, which controls the southern part of the country. It's even worse in the north, where militants linked to al-Qaida have outlawed virtually all music. Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Despite Censorship, Mali's Musicians Play On
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Jake Scott (a.k.a. 2 Pi), with student. Courtesy of Jake Scott hide caption

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2 Pi: Rhymes And Radii
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Bikini Kill performs in Washington, D.C., in the 1990s. Courtesy of Pat Graham hide caption

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Bikini Kill Rises Again, No Less Relevant
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Not mainstream enough to mark? A portrait of Dietrich Fischer-Dieskau taken circa 1965. Erich Auerbach/Getty Images hide caption

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Patti Page — known for such songs as "Tennessee Waltz" and "How Much Is That Doggie in the Window?" — is seen here in 1958. Page died Tuesday at age 85. Bettmann/Corbis hide caption

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Patti Page, Who Dominated The '50s Pop Charts, Dies
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Pakistanis welcome Muhammad Shahid Nazir, center, the singer of "One Pound Fish," at Lahore's airport Thursday. Hamza Ali/AP hide caption

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'One Pound Fish': A Pakistani Man's Passport To Fame
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In Minneapolis, the locked-out musicians of the Minnesota Orchestra are appealing for public support. /Courtesy of the Musicians of the Minnesota Orchestra hide caption

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Was 2012 The Year That American Orchestras Hit The Wall?
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