The young musicians of Seguro Que Si will perform in this weekend's Inaugural Parade. Left to right: Daniel Chico (bass), Kevin Arguelles (piano), Maxwell Frost (timbales), Christopher Muriel (congas), Niyah Lowell (bongos), Annette Rodriguez (vocal), Sean Fernandez (trumpet), Robby Cruz (trumpet). Greg Allen/NPR hide caption

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A High School Salsa Band In The Inaugural Parade? 'Of Course!'

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After a failed career at home in the U.S., the Chinese-American rapper Jin found an unexpected second chance at stardom on the other side of the world. Louis Trinh/Courtesy of artist hide caption

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Jin, 'The Chinese Kid Who Raps,' Grows Up

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Fatoumata Diawara and some of her musical collaborators on "Voices United for Mali" at a press conference held in Bamako, Mali on Jan. 17, 2013. Moustapha Diallo/courtesy of the artists hide caption

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Conductor Andres Orozco-Estrada, who has just been named as the next music director of the Houston Symphony. Martin Sigmund/courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Stefanie Drootin-Senseny and Chris Senseny are the core of Big Harp, a band the married couple formed shortly after the birth of their second child. Ryan Fox/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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A Married Duo Chases The Dream, Toddlers In Tow

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Over a quarter century, Naxos Records has evolved from an industry joke to a leading force in classical music. Naxos hide caption

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Naxos: The Little Record Label That Could (And Did)

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Bob Dylan in 1962. His extremely limited-edition 50th Anniversary Collection features unreleased material from his early career. John Cohen/Getty Images hide caption

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Why There Are Only 100 Copies Of The New Bob Dylan Record

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Conductor Simon Rattle, who has reportedly told the Berlin Philharmonic he will leave his post there in 2018. Thomas Rabsch/courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Herbie Hancock speaks with the current class of Thelonious Monk Institute of Jazz Performance masters degree students. Chip Latshaw/UCLA hide caption

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Rapper Amkoullel had one of his songs banned by Mali's government, which controls the southern part of the country. It's even worse in the north, where militants linked to al-Qaida have outlawed virtually all music. Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Despite Censorship, Mali's Musicians Play On

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Jake Scott (a.k.a. 2 Pi), with student. Courtesy of Jake Scott hide caption

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2 Pi: Rhymes And Radii

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Bikini Kill performs in Washington, D.C., in the 1990s. Courtesy of Pat Graham hide caption

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Bikini Kill Rises Again, No Less Relevant

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