Anyone who's had a lousy year would do well to jam Harvey Danger's "The Show Must Not Go On" as the clock strikes midnight. Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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'The Show Must Not Go On' by Harvey Danger

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Guy Clark is a storyteller who carves songs out of quiet moments and marginal characters. Senor McGuire hide caption

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This One's For Guy Clark, Americana's Craftsman

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The Austin band Black Joe Lewis and the Honeybears infuses a Robert Johnson classic with a rip-roaring rock edge. Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Scandalous

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Youth Lagoon's "Cannons" seems to have been recorded late at night, under the covers, with a flashlight. Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Year of Hibernation

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David Bazan's "Wolves at the Door" tells grim stories, but it's rooted in the spirit of forgiveness. JUCO hide caption

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Wolves at the Door

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Brooklyn Band Makes Literate Music For The Littles

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As it evolves, Peggy Sue's "Cut My Teeth" becomes increasingly complex, like a destructive relationship. Patrick Ford hide caption

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Cut My Teeth

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Circa 1300, King Wenceslas II of Bohemia. Hulton Archive/Getty Images hide caption

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Wenceslas: A Goodhearted King And His Popular Carol

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Tigran Hamasyan lets the melody sing a song of yearning and hope in "Mother, Where Are You?" Christian Ducasse hide caption

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Mother, Where Are You?

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El Rego, the godfather of Benin funk, and his band The Commandos. Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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El Rego: A Singer From Benin With Soul And Funk

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The London Philharmonic Orchestra crafts a sly take on a ubiquitous video-game staple. Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Greatest Video Game Music

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The Story Of The Chitlin' Circuit's Great Performers

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Tommy Stinson's "All This Way for Nothing" is a classic piece of Replacements-style fatalism from one who knows it well. /Steven Cohen hide caption

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One Man Mutiny

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