In "Waidio," singer Khaira Arby insists that women must be free to pursue their own happiness. Chris Nolan hide caption

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Waidio

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"How Come That Blood" is an old song, but in Sam Amidon's hands, it springs to life as if newly born. Samantha West hide caption

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How Come That Blood

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The album Sweet Dreams: Her Complete Decca Masters contains all of Cline's recordings on the label. Hip-O-Select hide caption

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Patsy Cline: A Country Career Cut Short

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Tame Impala's "Lucidity" is more about impact than innovation, but the music still stuns on contact. Ben Sullivan hide caption

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'Lucidity' by Tame Impala

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"Like a Liar" hinges on the charismatic and evocative voice of The Orbans' singer, Peter Black, and his moving admission of romantic failure. courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Like A Liar

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Listen to 'Been This Way'

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Though recorded late in Piano Red's life, "CC Rider" finds the singer/pianist in fine, lusty form. Tony Paris Archives hide caption

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CC Rider

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Best Coast's "Boyfriend" is a perfect soundtrack for bumming around the beach on a sweltering day. courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Boyfriend

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New Mix: Robert Plant, Richard Thompson And More

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A reissue of Carissa's Wierd's best work sets mournfully deadpan vocals against a vibrant bed of strings and accordions. Brian Marr hide caption

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'The Color That Your Eyes Changed With the Color of Your Hair' by Carissa's Wierd

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In "Bring Night," Sia caresses her words, while a reedy ache runs through every syllable. RJ Shaughnessy hide caption

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Bring Night

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Marty Stuart was born in Philadelphia, Miss., where he taught himself to play both the guitar and mandolin as a teenager. James Minchin III hide caption

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Marty Stuart Returns To His Roots On 'Ghost Train'

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If Steve Coleman's music sounds a little chilly sometimes, it's because he's more interested in compositional logics than setting a mood. Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Steve Coleman: 'Harvesting' Funky, Brainy Jazz

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