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Tiny Desk

Bettye LaVette

We were not prepared for Bettye LaVette's appearance in the NPR Music offices. We thought we were — having set up our cameras and recording gear and signed in all the friends who had heard she was scheduled to play and beaten down our door. But then she blew into the room and conquered it before she'd sung a single note.

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Tiny Desk

Phoenix

The band's instantly recognizable hits such as "1901" and "Lisztomania" were stripped down and reassembled as sweetly shambling acoustic numbers.

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Tiny Desk

Tarrus Riley

In the calm-before-the-storm part of the day and week — 10 o'clock on a Monday morning, to be exact — reggae singer Tarrus Riley, saxophonist Dean Fraser and guitarist Lamont Savory showed up and performed three gorgeous, harmony-drenched reggae songs.

Moby performs at NPR. David Gilkey and John Poole/NPR hide caption

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Tiny Desk

Moby And Kelli Scarr

On an early winter's evening, with an acoustic guitar and lyric sheet in hand, Moby and Kelli Scarr strolled up to Bob Boilen's desk and gave a small concert. The casual affair was the duo's first-ever live performance of their brand-new Project Song creation, "Gone to Sleep."

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Tiny Desk

Fredrik

Fredrik's new record, Trilogi, is a strange, dark concept album meticulously crafted in a studio, so there was no telling how the band might pull off its songs in a Tiny Desk Concert. With a single strummed guitar, a snare drum, a maraca and triggered odd sounds, it all came together beautifully.

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Tiny Desk

Lionel Loueke

Listen to any Lionel Loueke record long enough and you'll wonder, "How did he make that noise?" When the unusual jazz guitarist and his drummer showed up for a video performance at the NPR Music offices — literally with bells on — they helped answer that question.