A November demonstration against Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe's Designated Secrets Bill drew thousands of protesters. The Japanese Parliament has since passed the law, under which people convicted of leaking classified information will face five to 10 years in prison. Franck Robichon/European Pressphoto Agency/Landov hide caption

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Japan's State Secrets Law: Hailed By U.S., Denounced By Japanese

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'Times' Report Finds No al-Qaida Involvement In Benghazi Attack

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U.S. Judge Says NSA Phone Data Program Is Legal, Valuable

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Okinawa Gov. Hirokazu Nakaima speaks Friday at a news conference in Naha, Japan, in which he announced his approval of landfill work for the relocation of the U.S. military's Futenma air base within his prefecture, walking back his pledge to move the base off Okinawa. Kyodo /Landov hide caption

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Strategist Kilcullen: Warfare Is Changing In 3 Ways

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Female Marine recruits train on the rifle range during boot camp at Parris Island, S.C., on Feb. 25. The Marine Corps said it has postponed new physical standards that would require women to do three pullups, noting that many female recruits were not yet able to do so. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Marines: Most Female Recruits Don't Meet New Pullup Standard

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Diplomat's Arrest Causes US-India Strain

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The U.S. Air Force could retire the A-10 "Warthog," despite support for the plane from infantrymen and pilots. These types of clashes occur whenever the military tries to mothball a weapon. Staff Sgt. Melanie Norman/U.S. Air Force hide caption

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Air Force's Beloved 'Warthog' Targeted For Retirement

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