The current case of a prominent Chinese activist seeking U.S. protection has echoes of a similar episode in 1989. Then, physicist Fang Lizhi took refuge at the U.S. Embassy in Beijing. He spent a year there before the U.S. and China reached a deal allowing him to move to the U.S. He died this month in Arizona, at age 76. John B. Carnett/Popular Science via Getty Images hide caption

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White House Defends Drone Program

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Chinese activist Chen Guangchen is believed to be under U.S. protection, possibly at the U.S. embassy in Beijing. Ed Jones/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Chinese Activist's Escape Quickens A Quiet Diplomacy

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The FlyRights mobile app, created by The Sikh Coalition, will be available for download on Androids and iPhones starting Monday, April 30. Courtesy of The Sikh Coalition hide caption

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Profiled By The TSA? There's An App For That

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Civil Liberties Groups See Holes In Cyber Defense Bill

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Cyberwar May Be New Tool In Iran's Arsenal

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Wounded Warrior Battalions have been set up to help troops returning from combat recover from their injuries. But recent Pentagon reviews have found a pattern of overmedication in such battalions. Here, Marines assigned to Wounded Warrior Battalion East at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center in Bethesda, Md., graduate from a training course in January. Capt. Jill L. Wolf hide caption

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Wounded Warriors Face New Enemy: Overmedication

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U.S. Considers Ways To Keep Drones In Pakistan

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Cybersecurity experts say Iran has the resources necessary to be a major player in cyberwarfare. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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Could Iran Wage A Cyberwar On The U.S.?

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Author Seth Jones is an expert on international terrorism who has advised the U.S. Special Operations Command. Carol Earnest hide caption

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Predicting Al-Qaida's Future By Examining Its Past

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Napolitano: Secret Service Scandal Was Isolated Event

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The Marines' most senior officers — including top commander Gen. James Amos (shown here in 2011 in Afghanistan's Helmand province) — are weighing in on recent incidents involving misconduct by troops serving in Afghanistan. Bay Ismoyo/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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U.S. Military Wages Battle Against Misconduct

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'Convention' Of Convicted Terrorists At N.Y. Trial

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An Insider's Look Into The Secret Service

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Secret Service Forces Out 3 Agents

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