A helicopter from the American security contractor DynCorp provides air support as members of an Afghan eradication force plow opium poppies on April 3, 2006, in the Helmand province, Afghanistan. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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When Most U.S. Forces Leave Afghanistan, Contractors May Stay
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Concerns over China's air defense claims led Secretary of Defense Chuck Hagel to call Japan's defense minister Wednesday. Here, a man makes a call near a replica of a Chinese fighter jet displayed in Beijing Wednesday. Ng Han Guan/AP hide caption

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Afghan President Hamid Karzai attends the Loya Jirga, or grand assembly, in Kabul on Sunday. The assembly approved a deal that would allow the U.S. to keep troops in Afghanistan beyond 2014. But Karzai has not yet agreed to sign the deal. Rahmat Gul/AP hide caption

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Stewart Baker and Richard Falkenrath face off against David Cole and Michael German in an Intelligence Squared debate moderated by John Donvan on Nov. 20. Intelligence Squared U.S. hide caption

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Debate: Does Spying Keep Us Safe?
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White House: Iran Deal Delays Potential Nuclear Weapon
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President Obama, speaking on Saturday night, said the interim deal on Iran's nuclear program is an important first step. The Obama administration is currently working on several major initiatives in the Middle East. Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Protesters march on Oct. 26 to demand that the Congress investigate the National Security Agency's mass surveillance programs. Legally, the NSA can respond to many records requests from citizens with a non-committal answer. Jose Luis Magana/AP hide caption

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Pfc. Katie Gorz (center) served as a squad leader during the training at Camp Geiger, N.C. Tom Bowman/NPR hide caption

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Women Pass Marine Training, Clear First Hurdle To Combat Role
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Google and five other companies sent a letter last month to members of the Senate Judiciary Committee supporting legislation to reform NSA surveillance programs. Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP hide caption

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Profit, Not Just Principle, Has Tech Firms Concerned With NSA
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NSA Releases 1,000 Declassified Documents
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