Activists rally to call for the removal of Superior Court Judge Aaron Persky in San Francisco in June over his ruling in a sexual assault case. On Friday, the judge was transferred from criminal to civil court. Eric Risberg/AP hide caption

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A court-approved protest staged by Zimbabwe's opposition supporters seeking electoral reforms turned violent Friday in Harare when it was broken up by police. Zinyange Auntony /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Ramen will buy anything from smuggled fruit to laundry services from fellow inmates, a study at one prison finds. It's not just that ramen is tasty: Prisoners say they're not getting enough food. DigiPub/Getty Images hide caption

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The FDA says that facilities that collect blood donations throughout the United States should be testing donations for Zika within 12 weeks. Toby Talbot/AP hide caption

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All U.S. Blood Donations Should Be Screened For Zika, FDA Says

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Burkini bans in France have sparked international outrage. In London, people recently held a "Wear what you want beach party" outside France's embassy. Justin Tallis/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Hillary Clinton, seen on a TV camera monitor in 2013, has been criticized for not holding more press conferences. Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Has Hillary Clinton Actually Been Dodging The Press?

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Rough seas prevented the NOAA's Okeanos Explorer from collecting data in the the Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument in February. NOAA Office of Ocean Exploration hide caption

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Take it one syllable at a time: Papahānaumokuākea

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Smoke wafts over the highway linking the Bolivian capital of La Paz with the Chilean border during an ongoing clash between striking miners, who are blockading the road, and police. Aizar Raldes/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Lenroy Watt talks with residents of Miami's Little Haiti about Zika, leaving brochures in Creole about how to prevent the illness, as well as phone numbers for local mosquito control agencies and the county health department. Courtesy of Planned Parenthood hide caption

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Planned Parenthood Joins Campaign To Rid Miami Neighborhoods Of Zika

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Smoke wafts over the highway linking the Bolivian capital of La Paz with the Chilean border during an ongoing clash between striking miners, who are blockading the road, and police. Aizar Raldes/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Tsukimi Ayano's scarecrows congregate at a bus stop in Nagoro. The village used to be home to about 300 people; now there are 30. Ina Jaffe/NPR hide caption

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A Dying Japanese Village Brought Back To Life — By Scarecrows

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Lenny Zimmel puts Colby cheese curds into forms to make 40-pound blocks of cheese at Widmer's Cheese Cellars in Theresa, Wis. Record dairy production in the U.S. has produced a record surplus of cheese, causing prices to drop. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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America's Real Mountain Of Cheese Is On Our Plates

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Frank Mutz, 67, and his son Phil, 36. StoryCorps hide caption

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When The Family Business Is Keeping Cool, It Pays To Be Warm With People

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State Rep. Dickie Drake, who sponsored Alabama's new cursive law, says it's about making sure that state's students know how to perform important life tasks, such as signing their name. Peter Dazeley/Getty Images hide caption

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Cursive Law Writes New Chapter For Handwriting In Alabama's Schools

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These are insect cells infected with the Guaico Culex virus. The different colors denote cells infected with different pieces of the virus. Only the brown-colored cells are infectious, because they contain the complete virus. Michael Lindquist/Cell Press hide caption

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Cleanup crews roll through East Baton Rouge picking up debris from massive floods that ravaged the state last week. Ari Shapiro/NPR hide caption

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Cleanup Crews Roll Through Baton Rouge After Louisiana Flooding

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The cost of an EpiPen two-pack has risen more than 400 percent in recent years. The drug is used to halt severe allergic reactions. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Discounts Aren't Enough to Halt Outrage At High EpiPen Prices

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