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Gen. Joseph Dunford, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, speaks to reporters about the Niger operation during a briefing at the Pentagon on Monday. Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP hide caption

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Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP

Myeshia Johnson kisses the casket of her husband, Army Sgt. La David Johnson, during his burial service on Saturday in Hollywood, Florida. Sgt. Johnson and three other U.S. soldiers were killed in an ambush in Niger on October 4. GASTON DE CARDENAS/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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GASTON DE CARDENAS/AFP/Getty Images

Former Fox News host Bill O'Reilly paid $32 million to a colleague to settle sexual harassment allegations. Dimitrios Kambouris/Getty Images for Hollywood Reporter hide caption

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Dimitrios Kambouris/Getty Images for Hollywood Reporter

Fresh Headache For Murdochs: Bill O'Reilly Got Raise After Secret Payout

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President Trump has an opportunity to refocus on the military with a Medal of Honor ceremony and to congressional priorities as he heads to Capitol Hill Tuesday. Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images

U.S. Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl (center) is escorted to the military courthouse at Fort Bragg, N.C., on Oct. 16, the day he pleaded guilty to desertion and misbehavior before the enemy. Sara D. Davis/Getty Images hide caption

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Sara D. Davis/Getty Images

Japanese Prime Minister and ruling party president Shinzo Abe smiles after the general election Sunday in Tokyo in which his ruling party won a clear majority. The Asahi Shimbun/The Asahi Shimbun via Getty Images hide caption

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The Asahi Shimbun/The Asahi Shimbun via Getty Images

Japan's Prime Minister Isn't Popular, But His Coalition Won A Supermajority

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The foods on the left contain naturally occurring fibers that are intrinsic in plants. The foods on the right contain isolated fibers, such as chicory root, which are extracted and added to processed foods. The FDA will determine whether added fibers can count as dietary fiber on nutrition facts labels. Carolyn Rogers/NPR hide caption

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Carolyn Rogers/NPR

The FDA Will Decide Whether 26 Ingredients Count As Fiber

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Shinzo Abe, Japan's prime minister and president of the Liberal Democratic Party (LDP), center, raises his arm during an election campaign rally in Tokyo, on Saturday. Exit polls show the LDP winning a majority of parliament seats in Sunday's election. Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Venice! Not pictured: the apparent skein of streets that led the guiding motorcycle astray in the city's marathon Sunday. Dimitris Kamaras/Flickr hide caption

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Dimitris Kamaras/Flickr

Want to get smarter? Brain training games don't seem to help with that. Maskot/Getty Images hide caption

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Maskot/Getty Images

In Memory Training Smackdown, One Method Dominates

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Lindsay Cristides, a master's student in oceanography at Texas A&M University, anchors a research vessel in the Houston Ship Channel before taking samples of sediment left behind by Hurricane Harvey floods. The samples will be tested for contaminants including heavy metals. Rebecca Hersher/NPR hide caption

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Rebecca Hersher/NPR

Digging In The Mud To See What Toxic Substances Were Spread By Hurricane Harvey

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James Toback, writer of the 1991 film Bugsy, poses at the premiere of a re-make of his movie The Gambler in 2014 in Los Angeles. Chris Pizzello/Chris Pizzello/Invision/AP hide caption

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Chris Pizzello/Chris Pizzello/Invision/AP

A roll of "I Voted" stickers sits on a table at an elementary school during the U.S. presidential election on November 8, 2016 in Dearborn, Mich. Jeff Kowalsky/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jeff Kowalsky/AFP/Getty Images

AFL-CIO President Richard Trumka, who was re-elected to a third term Sunday night in St. Louis, speaks at the National Press Club in Washington, D.C., on April 4, 2017. Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

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Alex Brandon/AP