American actress Angelina Jolie speaks at a conference for the prevention of sexual violence in conflict, at the Dom Armije in Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina, in 2014. Ismail Duru/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images hide caption

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The mystery disease in South Sudan has not been identified but is known to cause fever and unexplained bleeding. Above: an image of another hemorrhagic fever, Marburg virus, made with an electron microscope and then colorized. BSIP/UIG/Getty Images hide caption

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Furloughed Polar workers picket outside Polar's Caracas brewery, which shut down in April. They are protesting against the government, which has impeded Polar's ability to import barley. John Otis for NPR hide caption

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Venezuela Is Running Out Of Beer Amid Severe Economic Crisis
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Most people who say they've had a concussion say they sought out medical care at the time. Science Photo Libra/Getty Images hide caption

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Poll: Nearly 1 In 4 Americans Reports Having Had A Concussion
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Members of the U.S. military who were exposed to mustard gas in secret experiments during World War II (from left): Harry Maxson, Louis Bessho, Rollins Edwards, Paul Goldman and Sidney Wolfson. Courtesy of the families hide caption

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Harambe, a western lowland gorilla, was fatally shot Saturday, May 28, 2016, to protect a 4-year-old boy who had entered its exhibit. Jeff McCurry/Cincinnati Zoo and Botanical Garden/AP hide caption

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The Code Switch Podcast, Episode 1: Can We Talk About Whiteness?
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A truck displaying a bumper sticker at Malheur National Wildlife Refuge headquarters on Jan. 5 near Burns, Ore. Armed anti-federalists took over the wildlife refuge in Oregon for 41 days. The occupation ended on Feb. 11. Rick Bowmer/AP hide caption

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Utah Sheriffs Threaten To Arrest Rangers If They Try To Close Public Lands
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Monarchs spend their winters in the central mountains of Mexico before traveling up through the United States to Canada. Sandy and Chuck Harris/Flickr hide caption

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Union members demonstrate outside the Trump Taj Mahal casino in Atlantic City, N.J., earlier this year to protest new owner Carl Icahn's refusal to reinstate health insurance and pension benefits that previous owners eliminated in bankruptcy court. Wayne Parry/AP hide caption

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Police officers search for a 7-year-old boy in the mountains of Hokkaido, where he went missing after his parents said they left him alone temporarily as a punishment. The Asahi Shimbun via Getty Images hide caption

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Immigrants from El Salvador, including one who says she is seven months pregnant, stand next to a U.S. Border Patrol truck after they turned themselves in to border agents on Dec. 7, 2015, near Rio Grande City, Texas. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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U.S.-Mexico Border Sees Resurgence Of Central Americans Seeking Asylum
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You may share everything with your parents, but health care providers might not be so open. Robert Lang Photography/Getty Images hide caption

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Benjamin Epstein, director of the Anti-Defamation League, stands on Martin Luther King Jr.'s right in this photo with Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy and Vice President Lyndon B. Johnson, taken June 22, 1963. Abbie Rowe/John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum hide caption

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Anti-Defamation League Chief Faces Challenge Trying To Renew Civil Rights Activism
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Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump caused a stir recently by saying that data and campaign technology was "overrated" in the political world. Matt Rourke/AP hide caption

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Trump's Disinterest In Data Has Some Republicans Worried
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Syria's Mohammed Faris was a national hero after he became the country's first cosmonaut in 1987, traveling to the Soviet Union's Mir Space Station. Now he's a refugee in Istanbul, Turkey. Faris, 65, is shown standing in front of a painting of himself as a cosmonaut. A critic of Syria's President Bashar Assad, he still hopes to return to his homeland. Peter Kenyon / NPR hide caption

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Once A National Hero, Syria's Lone Cosmonaut Is Now A Refugee In Turkey
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Nancy Shilts helped maintain a round-the-clock vigil at St. Frances X. Cabrini Church in Scituate, Mass., for nearly 12 years to protest its closure. Here, Shilts is shown on May 29, before the final service at the church. Steven Senne/AP hide caption

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After 11-Year Vigil, Massachusetts Catholic Church Holds Final Service
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Scientists say bumblebees can sense flowers' electric fields through the bees' fuzzy hairs. Jens Meyer/AP hide caption

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Bumblebees' Little Hairs Can Sense Flowers' Electric Fields
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