President Obama drinks a glass of filtered Flint water during a meeting with federal officials at the Food Bank of Eastern Michigan in Flint, Mich., on Wednesday. Daniel Mears/AP hide caption

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Panama's economy, expected to grow by 6 percent this year, is a bright spot in Latin America. Many Panamanians believe their country has been unfairly tarnished by the Panama Papers revelations. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Panama Papers Fallout Hurts A Reputation Panama Thought It Had Fixed
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Molecular markers show structures and cell types within a human embryo, shown here 12 days after fertilization. The epiblast, for example, appears in green. Gist Croft, Alessia Deglincerti, and Ali H. Brivanlou/The Rockefeller University hide caption

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Advance In Human Embryo Research Rekindles Ethical Debate
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Faced with the prospect of long wait times at airports this summer, Homeland Security is boosting its checkpoint staffing. In this photo from December, passengers line up to go through security at the Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood International Airport. Wilfredo Lee/AP hide caption

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Medical errors rank behind heart disease and cancer as the third leading cause of death in the U.S., Johns Hopkins researchers say. iStockphoto hide caption

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Hear Rachel Martin talk with Dr. Martin Makary
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Israeli Yosef Haim Ben-David (center), the ringleader in the killing of Palestinian teenager Mohammed Abu Khdeir in 2014, is escorted by Israeli policemen at the district court in Jerusalem on Tuesday. Ahmad Gharabli /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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(Left) Donald Trump speaks during a primary night news conference on Tuesday in New York City. (Right) Bernie Sanders speaks during a campaign rally in Louisville, Ky., on Tuesday. Mary Altaffer and Charlie Riedel/AP hide caption

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Students from Fort McMurray Composite High School are released early as wildfire burns nearby in Fort McMurray, Alberta, Canada on Tuesday. An uncontrolled wildfire burning near Fort McMurray in northern Alberta, the heart of Canada's oil sands region, has forced the evacuation of nearly all the city's 80,000 residents, local authorities said on Tuesday. Courtesy Kangeun Lee via Reuters hide caption

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The winning design for the American Institute of Architects' competition to design a tiny house community for Chicago was built in two days and displayed at the University of Illinois, Chicago campus. Courtesy of Marty Sandberg hide caption

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As A Guerrilla Movement, Tiny Homes May Emerge As Alternative To Shelters
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Baidu, China's largest search engine, is under investigation after a college student with a rare form of cancer said it promoted a fraudulent treatment. Alexander F. Yuan/AP hide caption

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China Investigates Search Engine Baidu After Student Dies Of Cancer
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Lead in the drinking water in Flint, Mich., has caused a massive public health crisis and prompted President Obama to declare a federal state of emergency there. Carlos Osorio/AP hide caption

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Educators In Flint Step Up Efforts To Reach Youngest Victims Of Tainted Water
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