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Aetna announced one of its largest pay hikes recently. CEO Mark Bertolini says he believes it largely could pay for itself by making workers more productive. Courtesy of Aetna hide caption

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Courtesy of Aetna

Health Insurer Aetna Raises Wages For Lowest-Paid Workers To $16 An Hour

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Health worker Jackie Carnegie delivers a rubella vaccine in Colorado in 1972. Ira Gay Sealy/Denver Post via Getty Images hide caption

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Ira Gay Sealy/Denver Post via Getty Images

Western Hemisphere Wipes Out Its Third Virus

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Derrick Jennings never goes without his hat, boots or cowboy belt buckle. He wears them so it's clear to people that he's a hardworking cowboy. Gloria Hillard for NPR hide caption

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Gloria Hillard for NPR

Compton's Cowboys Keep The Old West Alive, And Kids Off The Streets

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Amar Baramu carried his 70-year-old mother on his back for five hours, then rode with her on a bus for 12 more, to get her to a hospital for the head wound she suffered during the earthquake. Julie McCarthy/NPR hide caption

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Julie McCarthy/NPR

He Carried His Mom On His Back For 5 Hours En Route To Medical Care

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Former Guantanamo prison inmates walk between their tents and the U.S. Embassy in Montevideo, Uruguay's capital, where four former prisoners are protesting what they say is an inadequate deal in exchange for permanent asylum. Pablo Porciuncula/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Pablo Porciuncula/AFP/Getty Images

Ex-Gitmo Detainees In Uruguay Protest At U.S. Embassy

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September 13, 2009 photo of Andreas Lubitz, who is believed to have deliberately crashed Germanwings Flight 9525 into a mountain in southern France on March 24, 2015, killing all 150 people on board. Getty Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Getty Images/Getty Images

UnitedHealthcare says it will cover doctors' visits by live video on smartphones, tablets and computers. Doctor On Demand hide caption

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Doctor On Demand

The Doctor Will Video Chat With You Now: Insurer Covers Virtual Visits

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President Obama announced an initiative to give e-books to low-income students while visiting the Anacostia Library in Washington on Thursday. Shawn Thew//LANDOV hide caption

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Shawn Thew//LANDOV

The Plan To Give E-Books To Poor Kids

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What do you see in this image? An "uprising" or a "riot"? David Goldman/AP hide caption

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David Goldman/AP

Is It An 'Uprising' Or A 'Riot'? Depends On Who's Watching

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Tyrone Peake says he's been fired from three jobs because a crime he committed more than 30 years ago is still on his record. Carrie Johnson/NPR hide caption

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Carrie Johnson/NPR

Can't Get A Job Because Of A Criminal Record? A Lawsuit Is Trying To Change That

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