Burkini bans in France have sparked international outrage. In London, people recently held a "Wear what you want beach party" outside France's embassy. Justin Tallis/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Ramen will buy anything from smuggled fruit to laundry services from fellow inmates, a study at one prison finds. It's not just that ramen is tasty: Prisoners say they're not getting enough food. DigiPub/Getty Images hide caption

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Rough seas prevented the NOAA's Okeanos Explorer from collecting data in the the Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument in February. NOAA Office of Ocean Exploration hide caption

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Take it one syllable at a time: Papahānaumokuākea

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Director Nate Parker, actors Armie Hammer, Penelope Ann Miller, and Chike Okonkwo discuss 'The Birth of a Nation' at the Deadline.com panel at The Samsung Studio during The Sundance Festival 2016. Neilson Barnard/Getty Images for Samsung hide caption

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Smoke wafts over the highway linking the Bolivian capital of La Paz with the Chilean border during an ongoing clash between striking miners, who are blockading the road, and police. Aizar Raldes/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Hillary Clinton, seen on a TV camera monitor in 2013, has been criticized for not holding more press conferences. Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Has Hillary Clinton Actually Been Dodging The Press?

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Tsukimi Ayano's scarecrows congregate at a bus stop in Nagoro. The village used to be home to about 300 people; now there are 30. Ina Jaffe/NPR hide caption

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A Dying Japanese Village Brought Back To Life — By Scarecrows

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