In the aftermath of Superstorm Sandy, a former Red Cross official says, as many as 40 percent of the organization's emergency vehicles were assigned for public relations purposes. This photo, which shows one of the trucks on Long Island, N.Y., in January 2013, is one example of the many publicity photos taken by the Red Cross. Les Stone/American Red Cross hide caption

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Gary Morse, with wife Sharon, in 1999. Morse transformed a mobile home park in Florida into The Villages, a retirement community of more than 100,000 residents. Stephen M. Dowell/Orlando Sentinel hide caption

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Mary Mallon, known as "Typhoid Mary," was immune to the typhoid she carried. Working as a cook, she spread the disease in New York and ended up quarantined on Brother Island (above) for more than two decades. Bettmann/Corbis hide caption

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Don't look for leading Ebola researchers at the Sheraton New Orleans. Louisiana health officials told doctors and scientists who have been in West Africa not to come to a medical meeting in town. Prayitno/Flickr hide caption

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Dallas-area resident James Faulk turned his yard into an Ebola treatment center for Halloween. But he has a serious side: his Twitter account raises funds for Doctors Without Borders, a group active in the fight against the virus. Tom Pennington/Getty Images hide caption

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Congressman Michael Grimm is facing a 20-count federal indictment but despite the charges, Grimm stands a decent chance of being reelected in New York. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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Paraguayan government employee Daniel Alonso holds a portrait of Rutherford B. Hayes at the government building in Villa Hayes, the Paraguayan town named after the 19th U.S. president. Hayes is revered for a decision that gave the country 60 percent of its present territory. Jorge Saenz/AP hide caption

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Domitilia, 57, is a diabetic patient in the Dominican Republic who contracted tuberculosis. She's now cured of TB after two years of treatment. Javier Galeano/The Union hide caption

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