Dominique Strauss-Kahn, the former head of the International Monetary Fund, and his wife, Anne Sinclair, leave a Manhattan court on June 6. Timothy A. Clary/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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On 'Morning Edition': Carrie Johnson talks with Steve Inskeep
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Demonstrators gather outside the Minnesota State Capitol in St. Paul, Minn., as negotiations between Republican lawmakers and Democratic Gov. Mark Dayton continued in efforts to come to a budget agreement to avoid a government shutdown at midnight. Jim Mone/AP hide caption

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On Thursday, the Federal Election Commission gave comedian Stephen Colbert the OK to form a superPAC. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

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There's Nothing Funny About Colbert's SuperPAC
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Afghan National Army troops take a break while on a joint patrol and clearing operation with Butcher Troop, part of the U.S. Army's 1st Infantry Division, in eastern Afghanistan. David Gilkey/NPR/Redux hide caption

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Fighting Shifts To Afghanistan's Mountainous East
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Customers walk past a Toyota FJ Cruiser. Toyota brought in 19 percent of African-American buyers, 22 percent of Latino buyers and 33 percent of Asian-American buyers. Yoshikazu Tsuno/Getty Images hide caption

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Toyota Steers Ads To Bring In More Minority Buyers
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An image believed to be that of a hole-punch cloud. Scientists say airplanes create these patterns when they fly through certain types of clouds. The water in the clouds can turn to rain or snow and fall to the ground. H. Raab/Vesta/Wikimedia Commons hide caption

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Snow Delay At The Airport? Blame Planes And Clouds
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A man walks past the debris on June 12, 2011 in Otsuchi, Iwate, Japan. Japanese government has been struggling to deal with the earthquake and tsunami as well as the troubled Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant. The fear of infectious disease outbreak is mounting due to the humid rainy season and delay of the debris clearing. Kiyoshi Ota/Getty Images hide caption

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Soccer fans attend the women's World Cup opener between Germany and Canada. In Germany, the game drew a TV audience of more than 18 million, or a quarter of the country's population — better stats than some men's matches garner. AFP/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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