Anna Woydyla of Poland has lived in Britain for 11 years and works at a London restaurant. Many workers from EU countries are struggling with uncertainty about their future in Britain after the Brexit vote. Pawel Kuczynski/AP hide caption

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After Brexit, Uncertainty Over Status Of EU Workers Living In U.K.

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Two sisters, Majda (left) and Amina Belaroui, answered the call to volunteer for the French military reserves following the recent terrorist attack in Nice. But Majda refused to remove her headscarf and hijab, as required under a French law. Amina didn't want to remove her scarf and hijab but reluctantly agreed to do so. Courtesy of Majda and Amina Belaroui hide caption

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A view of the Russian Federal Security Services on Lubyanka Square in Moscow in 2013. Journalists, dissidents and human rights workers say they are often followed or harassed by the Russian spy service. Ivan Sekretarev/AP hide caption

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Was That A Russian Spy, Or Am I Getting Paranoid?

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Activists and supporters march on International Women's Day on March 8 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Marchers called for protection from male violence in a country with high rates of murder and assaults of women. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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For Brazil's Women, Laws Are Not Enough To Deter Rampant Violence

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The Chinese government-selected Panchen Lama, Gyaincain Norbu (right), took part in the Chinese People's Political Consultative Conference in Beijing on March 14. Greg Baker/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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German Chancellor Angela Merkel (right), and British Prime Minister Theresa May (left), listen to translations during a joint news conference in Berlin on July 20. They are the two most important figures in the negotiations over Britain's departure from the European Union, the so-called Brexit. Michael Sohn/AP hide caption

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The Two Female Leaders Who Have To Figure Out The Brexit

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A cyclist looks at the flowers and messages placed along the beach for victims of the recent terrorist attack in Nice, France, on Wednesday. The recent spate of attacks around the world has raised questions about the limits of counterterrorism. Claude Paris/AP hide caption

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A Summer Of Terrorism Points To The Limits Of Counterterrorism

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Kidlington is home to a number of 17th century cottages near its medieval church. This is the most historic part of the village, but it's not where the tourists went. Instead, tour buses dropped them off in a residential area built in the 1960s and 1970s. Lauren Frayer for NPR hide caption

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Turkish Land Forces commander Salih Zeki Colak (right), naval commander Admiral Bulent Bostanoglu (second right) and air force commander Abidin Unal (left) attend a funeral in Ankara on July 18 for police officers killed during the failed July 15 coup attempt. Adem Altan/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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After Failed Coup, How Will Turkey's Military Cope With All Its Challenges?

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French flags are seen lowered at half-staff in Nice on July 16. The truck attack on July 14 killed 84 people. "I felt coming to celebrate on holiday and people are in mourning didn't seem right," one vacationer says. "But I'm glad I came." Valery Hache/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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In Nice, Residents And Tourists Struggle To Adjust After Attack

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A Turkish special forces police officer stands guard in front of the Istanbul Justice Palace on July 20. Family members of those detained have been gathering outside, hoping for a chance to see their loved ones. Ozan Kose/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Fear Grips Turkey Amid Government Crackdown After Failed Coup

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Video screens Wednesday night in Istanbul's Taksim Square show President Recep Tayyip Erdogan as he announced a three-month state of emergency following last Friday's failed coup. Chris McGrath/Getty Images hide caption

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Turkey Begins 3-Month State Of Emergency Amid Ongoing Crackdown

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Forensic experts examine the wreckage of a car that exploded, killing prominent investigative journalist Pavel Sheremet, in Kiev, Ukraine, on Wednesday. Efrem Lukatsky/AP hide caption

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People wave Turkish flags Tuesday as they gather in Taksim Square in Istanbul, protesting against the attempted coup last Friday. The Turkish government accelerated its crackdown on alleged plotters of the failed coup against President Recep Tayyip Erdogan. Emrah Gurel/AP hide caption

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Turkey's Post-Coup-Attempt Purge Widens As Arrests And Firings Grow

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Secretary of State John Kerry talks with Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif in Vienna on Jan. 16, after the International Atomic Energy Agency verified that Iran met all conditions under the nuclear deal. The accord is now one-year-old. Iran is seen as abiding by the requirements of the deal, but its relations with the U.S. and other rivals have not improved on other fronts. Kevin Lamarque/AP hide caption

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Turkish police in the city of Mugla on Sunday detain members of the military suspected of involvement in Friday's attempted coup. Following the failed revolt, President Recep Tayyip Erdogan's government has moved swiftly, detaining some 7,000 suspects, many in the military and the government. Tolga Adanali/AP hide caption

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Turkey's President Cracks Down After Failed Coup

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Muslim cleric Fethullah Gulen (right) receives a vase from Israel's Chief Rabbi Eliyahu Bakshi Doron during a meeting in Istanbul, Turkey, in 1998. Turkey's President Recep Tayyip Erdogan on Saturday accused Gulen of involvement in a coup attempt, a charge Gulen denied. Murad Sezer/AP hide caption

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People gather and lay flowers on Nice's Promenade des Anglais on July 15. A French-Tunisian attacker left 84 people dead after driving a truck through crowds gathered to watch fireworks during Bastille Day celebrations. The attacker then opened fire on the crowd before being shot dead by police. Carl Court/Getty Images hide caption

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Former Florida Senator Bob Graham, shown here in 2011, co-chaired the congressional inquiry into possible Saudi government links to the Sept. 11 hijackers. He long advocated releasing the 2002 report, known as the "28 pages," which were made public on Friday. John Raoux/AP hide caption

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