A kindergarten teacher in Jerusalem stands with students as they listen to sirens that played nationwide on Thursday to commemorate Holocaust Remembrance Day. This year, a new national Holocaust curriculum is being fully implemented in kindergarten. Ellen Krosney for NPR hide caption

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In Israeli Kindergartens, An Early Lesson In The Holocaust
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President Ashraf Ghani (right) and Chief Executive Abdullah Abdullah (left) leave after signing a power-sharing deal in September 2014 at the presidential palace in Kabul. Afghanistan's National Unity Government is now in disarray. Massoud Hossaini/AP hide caption

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Panama's economy, expected to grow by 6 percent this year, is a bright spot in Latin America. Many Panamanians believe their country has been unfairly tarnished by the Panama Papers revelations. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Panama Papers Fallout Hurts A Reputation Panama Thought It Had Fixed
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Actor Vin Diesel drives a vintage American car next to actress Michelle Rodriguez while shooting the latest installment of the Fast and Furious movie franchise in Havana, Cuba on April 28. Fast and Furious 8 is the second U.S. movie, and the first big-budget Hollywood film, to be shot in Havana since relations began improving between the two countries. Fernando Medina/AP hide caption

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Hollywood Rediscovers Cuba: Is It Too Soon To Call It Havanawood?
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Women stroll on a Tehran street. Iranians are bracing themselves for extra scrutiny of their dress and behavior when a new, undercover morality police squad is deployed. Vahid Salemi/AP hide caption

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Springtime In Iran Means The 'Morality Police' Are Out In Force
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London Mayor Boris Johnson plays a guitar at an event to promote street performances in the city in March 2015. Johnson has broken ranks with Prime Minister David Cameron, a fellow Conservative Party member, by calling for Britain to leave the European Union. Alastair Grant/AP hide caption

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London's Popular And Populist Mayor Makes The Case For Leaving The EU
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Sabrina De Sousa, shown here at her Washington home in 2012, is a former CIA officer who was convicted in absentia by an Italian court for the 2003 abduction of a terrorism suspect, cleric Abu Omar, in Milan, Italy. She was detained in Portugal and could be extradited to Italy. The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Will An Ex-CIA Spy Go To Prison In Italy?
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Fillets of salmon, salted and smoked by H. Forman & Son, are destined for the U.S. grocery chain Whole Foods. Rich Preston/NPR hide caption

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Backing 'Brexit,' A Salmon Smokehouse Says It's Been Swimming Upstream
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Moyaad Saad, a 43-year-old former civil servant from Baghdad, feeds his 6-month-old daughter Zahara on their cot in a giant tent at a makeshift migrant camp near the border between Greece and Macedonia. Thousands of asylum seekers are now stuck here after several European countries closed their borders to them. Joanna Kakissis for NPR hide caption

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As Europe Closes Door To Refugees, Tough Choices For 2 Fathers
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A worker leaves the Baosteel Group Corporation plant in Shanghai in March 2016. Johannes Eisele/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Starbucks And Steel: The Divergent Directions Of China's Economy
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Shiite cleric Muqtada al-Sadr speaks in Najaf, Iraq, on Saturday. His supporters entered Baghdad's heavily fortified Green Zone and parliament the same day. Anmar Khalil/AP hide caption

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A Kenya Wildlife Services ranger stands guard in front illegal stockpiles of burning elephant tusks at the Nairobi National Park on April 30, 2016. Carl De Souza/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Up In Flames: Kenya Burns More Than 100 Tons Of Ivory
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Ahmed Darwish appears in a police station in Rumeilan, northern Syria, after being captured by Kurdish fighters as he was running away from a battle. He was wounded in a coalition airstrike in support of anti-ISIS forces. "There was camaraderie, friendship, like a brotherhood between us," he says of his time in ISIS. Alice Fordham/NPR hide caption

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Joining ISIS: It's Not Always For Reasons You Might Assume
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Chinese officials answer questions about a new law regulating overseas nongovernmental organizations during a press conference at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing on Thursday. The new law subjects NGOs to close police supervision. "We welcome and support all foreign NGOs to come to China to conduct friendly exchanges," one official said. Ng Han Guan/AP hide caption

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China Passes Law Putting Foreign NGOs Under Stricter Police Control
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Randy Berry, the first U.S. special envoy for the rights of LGBTI persons, is shown at a gay pride rally in Sao Paulo, Brazil, last June. He says the U.S. is supporting activists worldwide but recognizes the risks they face in many countries. A gay activist who worked at the U.S. Embassy in Bangladesh was hacked to death this week. Courtesy U.S. State Department hide caption

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For State Department's LGBTI Envoy, Every Country Is A Different Challenge
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Investors in Zhongjin, a wealth-management company that collapsed this month, demonstrate outside a police office in Shanghai's Hongkou district, demanding repayment of their funds. Police later detained one of the demonstrators for distributing protest T-shirts. Frank Langfitt/NPR hide caption

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Chinese Investors Reeling After Wealth Management Firm's Collapse
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People walk in front of Istanbul's Hagia Sophia on April 12. Turkey has seen tourist numbers plummet following a series of deadly terrorist attacks and a travel ban by Russia. Chris McGrath/Getty Images hide caption

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Terrorism Fears And Travel Bans Shake Tourism In Turkey
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Parakeets are among Colombia's 1,900 bird species. Alexander Schimmeck /Flickr hide caption

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As Colombia Grows Safer, Tourists — Especially Bird Lovers — Flock Back
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Manuel Santos feeds 6-month-old Carmen last July, as biological father Bud Lake looks on. A Thai court ruled Tuesday that Lake has custody of Carmen, now 15 months old. Michael Sullivan for NPR hide caption

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An independent paper owned by billionaire Russian businessman and Brooklyn Nets owner Mikhail Prokhorov — shown here Jan. 11 in New York — is under fire, but the Kremlin says it's not applying pressure on media. Seth Wenig/AP hide caption

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For Journalists In Russia, 'No One Really Knows What Is Allowed'
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The mother (right) of Abdel Hamid Abu Srour (portrait) mourns with family members as she receives condolences at the Al-Ruwad Center in the Aida Refugee Camp near Bethlehem on Friday. Musa Al Shaer/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Is This Week's Jerusalem Suicide Bombing A Warning Of More To Come?
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