"Multicultural Street" in Wongok Village features stores, restaurants and stalls that serve the international community. Elise Hu/NPR hide caption

toggle caption Elise Hu/NPR
In Homogeneous South Korea, A Multicultural Village Hints At Change
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/475232274/478114771" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Chinese lesbian couple Rui Cai (left) and Cleo Wu play with their twin babies, born last month. China does not allow same-sex marriages, and only married, heterosexual couples have access to assisted reproduction. The women went through in vitro fertilization in the U.S., and the children were born in China. Courtesy of Rui Cai and Cleo Wu hide caption

toggle caption Courtesy of Rui Cai and Cleo Wu
Undaunted By China's Rule Book, Lesbian Couple Welcomes Their Newborn Twins
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/477660115/477758601" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A special hearth (left) for "green" cremations uses less wood and takes less time than traditional cremations. The new cremation method cuts down on air pollution. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

toggle caption David Gilkey/NPR
In India, Eco-Friendly Cremation Is Easy — But It's A Tough Sell
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/477350818/477529367" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

In the opening scene of Another World: Losing Our Children to Islamic State, an actor playing a radical imam appears on stage. The play is a mix of journalism and theater, with its script based on the actual words, recorded in interviews, of mothers who lost children to ISIS, an American general and a former Guantanamo detainee. Courtesy of Tristram Kenton/National Theatre hide caption

toggle caption Courtesy of Tristram Kenton/National Theatre
Examining The Lure Of ISIS In 'Another World'
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/477023992/477141332" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A kindergarten teacher in Jerusalem stands with students as they listen to sirens that played nationwide on Thursday to commemorate Holocaust Remembrance Day. This year, a new national Holocaust curriculum is being fully implemented in kindergarten. Ellen Krosney for NPR hide caption

toggle caption Ellen Krosney for NPR
In Israeli Kindergartens, An Early Lesson In The Holocaust
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/476912786/476927421" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Actor Vin Diesel drives a vintage American car next to actress Michelle Rodriguez while shooting the latest installment of the Fast and Furious movie franchise in Havana, Cuba on April 28. Fast and Furious 8 is the second U.S. movie, and the first big-budget Hollywood film, to be shot in Havana since relations began improving between the two countries. Fernando Medina/AP hide caption

toggle caption Fernando Medina/AP
Hollywood Rediscovers Cuba: Is It Too Soon To Call It Havanawood?
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/476705832/476705833" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Some women in France say they feel conflicted by a growing presence of Islamic fashion, including the "burkini," a full-body swimsuit. These two are marketed by Marks & Spencer. Courtesy of Marks and Spencer hide caption

toggle caption Courtesy of Marks and Spencer
'Islamic Fashion' Causes A Stir In France
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/475511984/475511985" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Samsung is the largest employer and premier place to work in South Korea. Jung Yeon-je/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Jung Yeon-je/AFP/Getty Images
To The List Of High-Stakes Tests In Korea, Add The Samsung SAT
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/474621999/474788359" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A replica of Palmyra's 2,000-year-old Arch of Triumph is constructed in London's Trafalgar Square on Monday. The arch, a replica of a monument demolished by ISIS, was made using 3-D imaging produced from photographs. Dan Kitwood/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Dan Kitwood/Getty Images

Teenagers sit on a new sign reading "Cidade Olimpica" (Olympic City) in Rio de Janeiro's port district last October. Ahead of this summer's Olympic Games, the port district is undergoing an urban renewal program. Ticket sales have been slow, and many Brazilians cite the poor state of the economy, which is in recession. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Mario Tama/Getty Images
Brazil's Latest Headache: Ticket Sales Lag For Rio Olympics
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/473828835/473850624" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Dr. Hong Jung Geun, chief surgeon at Metro Plastic Surgery Clinic in Seoul (left), performs a pro-bono scar removal procedure on a former North Korean. Haeryun Kang/NPR hide caption

toggle caption Haeryun Kang/NPR
How S. Korea's Plastic Surgeons Are Helping Scarred N. Korean Defectors
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/472931436/473416768" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The Shanghai Rowing Club (middle) was rescued after preservationists fought a proposed demolition. In the background to the left is the futuristic skyline of Shanghai's financial district, Lujiazui. Frank Langfitt/NPR hide caption

toggle caption Frank Langfitt/NPR
After Decades, A Shanghai Preservationist Heads Home To America
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/472258492/473416798" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Shanghai has long had an active nightlife culture ranging from jazz clubs to — more recently — bars focused on mixology. Frank Langfitt/NPR hide caption

toggle caption Frank Langfitt/NPR
'Shanghai Nightscapes': Dancing, Drinking And All That Jazz
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/472259316/473063778" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Pakistani religious protesters march in the capital Islamabad on Wednesday, where tens of thousands demonstrated this past week. Their demands included government assurances that the country's strict blasphemy laws would not be eased. The protesters agreed to leave after saying they had received such promises. Anadolu Agency/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Anadolu Agency/Getty Images

In the wake of the Brussels bombings, Belgians are visiting a makeshift memorial in the heart of the city and raising flags of countries around the world. In a country known for its divisions, some Belgians say the traumatic events has united them in ways they didn't expect. Melissa Block / NPR hide caption

toggle caption Melissa Block / NPR
In Divided Belgium, Some Find That Trauma Unites Them
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/472170953/472176340" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Arab-Israeli colleagues react to the departure of the last Palestinian SodaStream employees from the company's plant in the Israeli city of Rahat on Feb. 29. Jack Guez/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Jack Guez/AFP/Getty Images
When 500 Palestinians Lose Their Jobs At SodaStream, Who's To Blame?
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/471885452/472035989" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Hozaifa Almaleh (No. 9, on the right of the front row) was a leading member of Syria's national basketball team from 2004 to 2013. He left the country because of war and now plays professionally in Chicago. Courtesy of Hozaifa Almaleh hide caption

toggle caption Courtesy of Hozaifa Almaleh

Nuuk, Greenland's capital, hosted about 2,000 people for this year's Arctic Winter Games. It was the biggest event ever held in Greenland. Rebecca Hersher/NPR hide caption

toggle caption Rebecca Hersher/NPR
At Arctic Winter Games, Biathlons, Stick Pulls And Sledge Jumps
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/469983624/470194311" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript