Cairo's Museum of Islamic Art reopened this month after being closed since a 2014 car bombing. Egypt's antiquities minister called the museum's revival a victory over terrorism. Jane Arraf/NPR hide caption

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Jane Arraf/NPR

Cairo's Islamic Art Museum Reopens 3 Years After A Car Bomb Damaged It

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Colombian actor Andres Parra (left) plays Hugo Chavez in the new telenovela, El Comandante. Manuel Rodriguez/Sony Pictures hide caption

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For Venezuela's Hugo Chavez, A Second Life On The Small Screen

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Khoshaba Jaber, an Assyrian living in West London, plays a tambura, a traditional instrument known as the "mother of strings," after singing an epic poem he learned in his boyhood village in northern Iraq. Alice Fordham/NPR hide caption

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In England, An Effort To Preserve Ancient, Epic Assyrian Poetry

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Renho Murata, the leader of Japan's main opposition Democratic Party. Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Bloomberg via Getty Images

Women Are Making Their Voices Heard In Male-Dominated Japanese Politics

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The police force for protection of Italy's cultural heritage is headquartered in Rome's Piazza Sant'Ignazio. Sylvia Poggioli/NPR hide caption

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For Italy's Art Police, An Ongoing Fight Against Pillage Of Priceless Works

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Anglican Archbishop Emeritus Desmond Tutu (left) celebrates Mass on his 85th birthday at St. George's Cathedral in Cape Town, South Africa, on Oct. 7. Tutu has called for the right to assisted death, which is currently illegal in his country. Schalk van Zuydam/AP hide caption

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Schalk van Zuydam/AP

Desmond Tutu Joins Advocates To Call For Right To Assisted Death

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The French government has bulit an exact replica of the prehistoric paintings in Lascaux, next to the originals. This photo was taken in the replicated cave. The originals were painted some 20,000 years ago, but are closed to the public to protect the artwork. Eleanor Beardsley/NPR hide caption

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Next To The Original, France Replicates Prehistoric Cave Paintings

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Frenchman Jean Yves Boyer buys a copy of the French weekly Le Canard Enchainé, which marks its 100th anniversary this year. It sells 400,000 copies a week and is profitable, though it has no advertising and just a bare-bones webpage. Courtesy of Rebecca Rosman hide caption

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Courtesy of Rebecca Rosman

"Samba doesn't accept restraint," says Sao Paulo performer Douglas Germano. "It has to break free or else it dies." Courtesy of Douglas Germano hide caption

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Courtesy of Douglas Germano

A History Of U.S.-China Relations

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Camilo Jené, 51, watches as his daughter Clara, 14, does her homework at their dining table. She refuses to do homework on weekends now. Lauren Frayer for NPR hide caption

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Kids In Spain Rebel Against Homework, And Parents Are Their Biggest Boosters

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A statue of Mozambique's first president, Samora Machel, at a city square in the capital Maputo. The monument is one of many similar statues built throughout Africa by North Korean workers. The United Nations on Wednesday banned the export of North Korean monuments, saying the government was earning hard currency that could be used to advance its nuclear program. Thomas Trutschel/Photothek via Getty Images hide caption

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Thomas Trutschel/Photothek via Getty Images

Still life with Flowers, Gilt Goblets, Coins and Shells was created by Clara Peeters in 1612. Peeters hid small self portraits in the goblet on the right. Staatliche Kunsthalle hide caption

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Staatliche Kunsthalle

In A First, Spain's Prado Museum Puts The Spotlight On A Female Artist

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A photograph of the late Palestinian leader Yasser Arafat hangs outside a door leading to the small bedroom where he spent his final years, a display at the new Arafat Museum in the West Bank city of Ramallah. Abbas Momani/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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In The Spot Where He Spent His Final Years, A Museum Honors Yasser Arafat

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Jurgen Todenhoefer in 2014 ullstein bild/ullstein bild via Getty Images hide caption

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ullstein bild/ullstein bild via Getty Images

Targeted To Teens, A German Play About ISIS Stokes Fear, Teaching Opportunities

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Archaeologist Layla Salih looks around the ancient site of Nimrud, in northern Iraq, outside Mosul. The Islamic State captured the area in 2014 and destroyed many of its archaeological treasures that date back 3,000 years. The extremist group was recently driven out of Nimrud, allowing Salih and others to come back and survey the extensive damage. Alice Fordham/NPR hide caption

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Alice Fordham/NPR

In Northern Iraq, ISIS Leaves Behind An Archaeological Treasure In Ruins

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A cruise ship passes Venice's St. Mark's Square at sunset in September. Up to 90,000 tourists fill the city every day, far outnumbering the 55,000 residents. Tiziana Fabi/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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As Tourists Crowd Out Locals, Venice Faces 'Endangered' List

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Members of Women of the Wall, which lobbies for women to be allowed to sing and pray aloud at the Western Wall, march through the Jewish quarter of Jerusalem's Old City. The group organizes monthly marches and are often heckled by ultra-Orthodox men. Lauren Frayer/NPR hide caption

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Women's Rights Become A Battleground For Israel's Ultra-Orthodox Jews

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The new Grand Egyptian Museum, seen here near the pyramids of Giza in June 2015, is due to open late next year. It will display thousands of artifacts, many of them never shown publicly before. Khaled Desouki/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Khaled Desouki/AFP/Getty Images

Fit For A King: Grand Museum Will Showcase Tut And Egypt's Ancient Culture

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Ultra-Orthodox Jews, many of whom live in closed religious communities, on a bus tour of the Israeli offices of Google, Facebook and Microsoft. The tour is sponsored by KamaTech, a group that helps integrate the ultra-Orthodox into Israel's high-tech sector. Lauren Frayer/NPR hide caption

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As Israel's Ultra-Orthodox Enter The Workforce, High-Tech Beckons

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