Muslim cleric Fethullah Gulen (right) receives a vase from Israel's Chief Rabbi Eliyahu Bakshi Doron during a meeting in Istanbul, Turkey, in 1998. Turkey's President Recep Tayyip Erdogan on Saturday accused Gulen of involvement in a coup attempt, a charge Gulen denied. Murad Sezer/AP hide caption

toggle caption Murad Sezer/AP

Former Florida Senator Bob Graham, shown here in 2011, co-chaired the congressional inquiry into possible Saudi government links to the Sept. 11 hijackers. He long advocated releasing the 2002 report, known as the "28 pages," which were made public on Friday. John Raoux/AP hide caption

toggle caption John Raoux/AP

People lay flowers Friday near the seafront in Nice in tribute to victims of Thursday's truck attack that killed more than 80 people. France has suffered three major terrorist attacks since 2015 and appears as vulnerable as any Western nation. Clément Mahoudeau/IP3/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Clément Mahoudeau/IP3/Getty Images

People line up to buy groceries outside a supermarket in Caracas, Venezuela's capital, on July 13. The State Department issued a travel warning for the country on July 7. Four other countries have been the subject of U.S. travel warnings since July 1. Federico Parra/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Federico Parra/AFP/Getty Images

U.S. Often Issues Travel Warnings, But Lately The Tables Are Turned

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/485877515/486063785" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Venezuela's President Nicolas Maduro waves to supporters as he walks with his wife Cilia Flores in the capital Caracas on July 5, Venezuela's Independence Day. As the country's crisis has deepened, Maduro has lost support, but the military remains on his side. Ariana Cubillos/AP hide caption

toggle caption Ariana Cubillos/AP

Venezuela's Embattled President Loses Support, But Clings To Power

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/485876144/485895875" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Theresa May, Britain's home secretary and a member of the Conservative Party, is poised to become the new prime minister this week. She favors keeping Britain in the European Union, but says she accepts the will of voters who opted to leave the EU in a June 23 referendum. Matt Dunham/AP hide caption

toggle caption Matt Dunham/AP

Small fishing boats sit in the dock in Tanmen on Hainan Island. The government has subsidized the upgrading of Tanmen's fishing fleet as part of its drive to exert more control in the South China Sea. Anthony Kuhn/NPR hide caption

toggle caption Anthony Kuhn/NPR

In A Chinese Port Town, South China Sea Dispute Is Personal

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/485512618/485512619" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The new president of the Philippines, Rodrigo Duterte (right) walks beside the new police chief, Ronald Bato Dela Rosa, (left) as he was sworn in on July 1 in Manila. Duterte assumed the presidency on June 30, pledging a ruthless approach to suspected drug traffickers. Dozens have been killed by police in recent days. Noel Celis/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Noel Celis/AFP/Getty Images

Under A Hard-Line President, Dozens Of Drug Suspects Killed In Philippines

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/485240811/485432533" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

People line up to buy goods at a supermarket in Caracas, Venezuela, on June 13. Federico Parra/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Federico Parra/AFP/Getty Images

Venezuela's Economic Implosion Exacerbates Inequality

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/485058730/485058731" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Harry McEachan, a former baker and auto factory worker in Glasgow, is furious with the Conservative (also known as Tory) Party for engineering a successful Brexit vote. McEachan plans to vote for Scottish independence if there is a second referendum. Frank Langfitt/NPR hide caption

toggle caption Frank Langfitt/NPR

Ripple Effects: Will The Brexit Vote Lead To The Breakup Of The U.K.?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/484888250/484894704" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Police patrol traffic in Paris as part of new anti-pollution measures aimed at punishing vehicles registered before 1997 that are forbidden to be driven during the week. Nearly 30 police officers stood guard on the morning of July 1, in the main squares of Paris to control and raise awareness among the drivers about the new measures. FRANCOIS GUILLOT/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption FRANCOIS GUILLOT/AFP/Getty Images

To Fight Pollution, Paris Imposes Weekday Ban On Old Cars

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/484381708/484381709" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

An Iran Air Boeing 747 is parked at Mehrabad International Airport in Tehran in this 2003 photo. Boeing has agreed to lease or sell about 100 aircraft to Iran, but there are still potential obstacles. Hasan Sarbakhshian/AP hide caption

toggle caption Hasan Sarbakhshian/AP

More Than Airplanes Are Riding On Boeing's Deal With Iran

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/484284777/484284778" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Mistafa Fanouni was the target of one of the more than 3,500 house raids that French police have carried out across the country since last November. After the raid, Fanouni was placed under house arrest until a court ruled in his favor to lift the arrest in February. Eleanor Beardsley/NPR hide caption

toggle caption Eleanor Beardsley/NPR

Sweeping Raids In France Raise Concerns About Civil Liberties

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/484284791/484284792" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Prime Minister David Cameron's cat, Larry, sits on the steps of No. 10 Downing St. in London on June 24, the day Brexit voting results were announced. If the Cameron family wants to take Larry along on holiday to France, a Brexit could complicate plans. It's possible that traveling to and from the EU with pets will grow more cumbersome. Alastair Grant/AP hide caption

toggle caption Alastair Grant/AP

The United Kingdom Independence Party's "Breaking Point" EU referendum campaign poster was deemed so offensive and reminiscent of Nazi propaganda that even the official Leave campaign condemned it. Jack Taylor/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Jack Taylor/Getty Images

The Joint European Torus, a European fusion project in the U.K., gets most of its funding from the EU. Brexit may change that, and the even larger ITER fusion project. EUROfusion hide caption

toggle caption EUROfusion

Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos (left) and FARC commander Timoleon Jimenez (right) shake hands as Raul Castro looks on at a signing ceremony of a cease-fire deal in Havana last Thursday. "It is the first time ever that a guerrilla group lays down its arms to submit to a justice system where they are going to be investigated, judged, and condemned and sanctioned," Santos told NPR. Desmond Boylan/AP hide caption

toggle caption Desmond Boylan/AP

Colombia's President: Making Peace With Rebels Is 'A Good Investment'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/483976526/483976533" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon (left) and Greenland's then-Prime Minister Aleqa Hammond stand on the ice outside the city of Uummannaq, north of the Arctic Circle, in 2014. Greenland held a referendum in 1982 and voted to leave the European Economic Community, the forerunner of the European Union. Greenland's leaders say they believe it was the right decision. Leiff Josefsen/AP hide caption

toggle caption Leiff Josefsen/AP

Britain Won't Be The First To Leave A United Europe. Guess Who Was?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/483877464/483890406" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript