Politics & Policy : Parallels U.S. policy can change the course of another country and, increasingly, the reverse is true. From social issues to geopolitical strategy, we connect the dots — and seek out possible lessons for the future.

People hold a banner reading "I am not afraid" in the Catalan language during an Aug. 26 demonstration condemning the attacks that killed 16 people last month in Barcelona. Manu Fernandez/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Manu Fernandez/AP

After Barcelona Attacks, Catalans Look Ahead To Independence Vote

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/547909330/547964128" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Chinese President Xi Jinping, center, arrives for a welcome ceremony for Tajikistan's President Emomali Rahmon in Beijing on Thursday. State media announced a key Chinese Communist Party meeting held once every five years will start on Oct. 18. Mark Schiefelbein/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Mark Schiefelbein/AP

President Donald Trump, joined by Vice President Mike Pence and Secretary of State Rex Tillerson, listens to a question during a meeting with Finnish President Sauli Niinisto in the Oval Office on Monday. Tillerson, when asked Sunday whether Trump's response to violence in Charlottesville, Va., represented American values, said that "the president speaks for himself." Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Evan Vucci/AP

Are Trump's Foreign Policy Stumbles First-Year Growing Pains Or A Reason For Worry?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/547298214/547373394" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Conservative Party politician Jacob Rees-Mogg stands in the garden of his mansion in the west of England. Known for his posh, upper-class traits, Rees-Mogg has become an unlikely hit on social media. Frank Langfitt/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Frank Langfitt/NPR

Marlene Schiappa started a blog, Maman Travaille (Mom Works), that quickly grew into a 10,000-woman advocacy network. As gender equality minister, she wants to criminalize sexual harassment on the streets. President Emmanuel Macron has tasked her with tackling pay inequity as well. Joanna Kakissis/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Joanna Kakissis/NPR

France's Gender Equality Minister Wants On-The-Spot Fines For Sexual Harassers

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/545297078/546323263" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Tunisian women gather to celebrate Women's Day on Aug. 13 in Tunis. On the same day, the country's president announced the review of a law requiring that a man receive twice the share of an inheritance as a woman. Anadolu Agency/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Anadolu Agency/Getty Images

President Trump and Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu shake hands in Jerusalem in May. Some critics say Netanyahu responded cautiously to the Charlottesville rally because he wanted to avoid angering Trump. Sebastian Scheiner/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Sebastian Scheiner/AP

President Trump meets with Russian President Vladimir Putin at the Group of 20 summit in Hamburg, Germany, on July 7. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Evan Vucci/AP

Trump And Russia: Lots Of Talk, But Critics Say There's No Clear Strategy

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/542647072/543769894" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Arabic signs have replaced Turkish ones in Istanbul's Fatih neighborhood, where many Syrian refugees have settled. Turkey has absorbed some 3 million Syrian refugees since the Syrian war began. Lauren Frayer/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Lauren Frayer/NPR

For Syrian Refugees In Turkey, A Long Road To Regular Employment

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/543471407/543494842" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

An armored Chinese police van is seen next to the Friendship Bridge on the Yalu River connecting the North Korean town of Sinuiju and the Chinese city of Dandong. China is North Korea's biggest trading partner. Nicolas Asfouri/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Nicolas Asfouri/AFP/Getty Images

Israel's Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu meets President Trump's Middle East envoy Jason Greenblatt in Jerusalem on June 21. Handout/Amos Ben Gershom/GPO/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Handout/Amos Ben Gershom/GPO/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images

Russian President Vladimir Putin leads a Cabinet meeting at the Novo-Ogaryovo residence outside Moscow on Wednesday. Alexei Nikolsky/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Alexei Nikolsky/AP

In Putin's Russia, An 'Adhocracy' Marked By Ambiguity And Plausible Deniability

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/538535186/538536109" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn is mobbed by young supporters after addressing an anti-austerity rally in Parliament Square, London, following a march through the city on July 1. Victoria Jones - PA Images/PA Images via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Victoria Jones - PA Images/PA Images via Getty Images

Once Seen As Too Left-Wing, Will Jeremy Corbyn Be U.K.'s Next Prime Minister?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/536861005/538472772" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Ram Nath Kovind (left) walked with Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi (right) and Bharatiya Janata Party senior leader L.K. Advani (center) on their way to file Kovind's nomination papers for the presidential elections in New Delhi on June 23. Kovind belongs to the lowest rank of Hinduism's hierarchy. Manish Swarup/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Manish Swarup/AP

Anatoly Antonov smiles at an October 2016 briefing at Russia's Defense Ministry in Moscow. Antonov is "able to shift in a nanosecond from warmly charming to caustically sarcastic," says a former U.S. defense official. Ivan Sekretarev/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Ivan Sekretarev/AP

Moscow's Likely New Ambassador To U.S.: 'Tough' And 'Not That Easy To Work With'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/537942168/537949353" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

In a photo provided Saturday by the Shenyang Municipal Information Office, Liu Xia, center, the widow of Chinese dissident Liu Xiaobo, holds a portrait of him during his funeral. She stands with Liu Hui, her younger brother (left) and Liu Xiaoxuan, the younger brother of her late husband, who is holding his cremated remains. AP hide caption

toggle caption
AP

British Prime Minister Theresa May marked a year in office last week. After her party lost parliamentary seats in elections last month, doubts have arisen over how long she'll remain prime minister. Dan Kitwood/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Dan Kitwood/Getty Images

One Year On, Theresa May Keeps Fragile Grip On Her Job As British Prime Minister

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/537268169/537948610" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Nael Skaik, the pharmacy director at Gaza's main hospital, says this medicine storage room is usually so full of boxes of medicines that it's hard to find space to walk. Now medicines are running out as Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas has held up medicine shipments to Gaza to pressure Gaza's Hamas leaders to surrender power. Daniel Estrin/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Daniel Estrin/NPR

10 Years After Gaza Takeover, Hamas Under Pressure To Surrender Power

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/537031035/537754652" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

This 2009 photo released by a friend of Xiyue Wang shows Wang at his apartment in Hong Kong. Princeton University professor Stephen Kotkin, who advised Wang, defended his former student as innocent of all charges against him. Friend of Xiyue Wang/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Friend of Xiyue Wang/AP

Academic Adviser Of U.S. Student Jailed In Iran: 'Everything He Did Was Normal'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/537735839/537754640" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Protesters display portraits of jailed Chinese Nobel Peace Prize laureate Liu Xiaobo outside the Chinese liaison office in Hong Kong on Wednesday. Liu has expressed the wish to leave China for medical treatment, but the government has refused. Vincent Yu/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Vincent Yu/AP

As China's Strength Has Grown, So Has Its Unwillingness To Let Dissidents Leave

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/536826050/536843269" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">