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An International Atomic Energy Agency inspector cuts a uranium enrichment connection at Iran's Natanz facility, 200 miles south of Tehran, in 2014. This week's nuclear deal gives the IAEA up to 150 inspectors to monitor Iran for compliance. Kazem Ghane/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Kazem Ghane/AP

A farmer stands near a field in South Hwanghae, North Korea. Wong Maye-E/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Wong Maye-E/AP

An Iranian family walks past anti-U.S. graffiti on the wall of the former U.S. embassy in Tehran on Tuesday. President Hassan Rouhani told Iranians that "all our objectives" have been met by a nuclear deal agreed upon Tuesday after talks with six world powers, including the U.S. Atta Kenare/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Atta Kenare/AFP/Getty Images

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Iranian hard-liners hang petitions from the Azadi (Freedom) Tower in Tehran during a June 30 demonstration demanding a "good deal" in the nuclear negotiations between Iran and six world powers. Negotiators announced a deal Tuesday morning in Vienna. Vahid Salemi/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Vahid Salemi/AP

Burundi's President Pierre Nkurunziza walks with military officials during the country's Independence Day on Wednesday. Despite criticism at home and abroad, the president is defying a two-term limit and running for a third term in an election set for the middle of July. Berthier Mugiraneza/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Berthier Mugiraneza/AP

A man waits at an Athens bus stop where the Greek word "no" has been spray-painted over "yes" on a banner put up in advance of Sunday's referendum. Greek voters will say whether they want to accept or reject a deal that's been offered by the country's creditors. Greeks are deeply divided and analysts say the outcome is not clear. Thanassis Stavrakis/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Thanassis Stavrakis/AP

Adm. Michael Rogers, NSA director and head of the U.S. Cyber Command, has avoided singling out China for blame in the OPM hack, which may affect as many as 18 million federal workers. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Marta Elsie Leveron, 19, (left) and her brother Freddy David Leveron, 18, have not seen their father since he left El Savador to work in California in 1999. A new U.S. program allows families to reunite if one parent is a legal U.S. resident. The girl in the middle is Liliana Beatriz Leveron, 16, a cousin of the other two. Her parents are in the U.S. and she's seeking to reunite with them as well. Carrie Kahn/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Carrie Kahn/NPR

Federal agents seized Elián González, held in a closet by Donato Dalrymple, in Miami in April 2000. Dalrymple rescued the boy from the ocean after his mother drowned when they tried to escape Cuba. Alan Diaz/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Alan Diaz/AP

South Korean Foreign Minister Yun Byung-se (left) speaks with Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe at their meeting in Tokyo. The two countries are marking the 50th anniversary of establishing relations. While leaders in both countries stressed the importance of the ties, a bitter history continues to strain the relationship. Issei Kato/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Issei Kato/AP

Serbian protesters hold a banner that reads: "Serbia-Russia, we don't need the European Commission" on March 21 in Belgrade. The marchers were from a Serbian nationalist organization opposed to the government, which has pursued closer ties with Western Europe. Darko Vojinovic/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Darko Vojinovic/AP

The indictment against 24-year-old Palestinian Ayman Mahareeq says comments he posted on Facebook illegally insulted the West Bank police force and the Palestinian Authority, which governs the West Bank. Emily Harris/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Emily Harris/NPR

Qatari official Mohammed al-Emadi (left) visits Hamas leader Ismail Haniyeh in Gaza City on March 12. Israel has accused Qatar of financing Hamas weaponry but still allows Qatar to spends millions in Gaza on aid and development projects. Ashraf Amra/APA/Landov hide caption

itoggle caption Ashraf Amra/APA/Landov

Mohammad and Linda Jomaa al-Halabi, along with their five daughters, are among the fewer than 1,000 Syrian refugees who have been resettled in the U.S. They left Syria in August 2012 and arrived last year in Baltimore, where they live now. Michele Kelemen/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Michele Kelemen/NPR

A medical staff member wearing a protective suit waits to enter an isolation ward for patients with Middle East respiratory syndrome, or MERS, in South Korea. Ed Jones/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Ed Jones/AFP/Getty Images

Concertgoers take photos of the band Intocable at a concert in Juarez, Mexico last year. Kainaz Amaria/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Kainaz Amaria/NPR

Egyptian security forces take up positions during anti-government demonstrations in Cairo last November. Egyptian activists have been disappearing in growing numbers, and human rights groups say they believe the security forces are responsible. Amr Sayed/APA\Landov hide caption

itoggle caption Amr Sayed/APA\Landov

Simon Clements, left, and Steve Williams with their 6-month-old daughter, Sophie, in London. The two British men began the process of finding a surrogate mother more than two years ago. While legal in the U.K., the practice of surrogacy is tightly restricted. Ari Shapiro/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Ari Shapiro/NPR

Family members of Americans held or missing in Iran attend a hearing of the Foreign Affairs Committee on Capitol Hill on Tuesday. From left: Ali Rezaian, brother of Washington Post journalist Jason Rezaian; Nagameh Abedini, wife of Saeed Abedini; Sarah Hekmati, sister of Amir Hekmati; and Daniel Levinson, son of Robert Levinson. Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images

Visitors check out the Soviet-era metro cars exhibited at the Partizanskaya subway station in Moscow, as part of festivities marking the subway system's 80th anniversary. Pavel Golovkin/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Pavel Golovkin/AP

The Polar Star completes ice drills in the Arctic in July 2013. Built in the 1970s and only meant to last 30 years, the vessel is the U.S. Coast Guard's only heavy icebreaker. U.S. Coast Guard/Reuters/Landov hide caption

itoggle caption U.S. Coast Guard/Reuters/Landov