Mourners carry the body of Palestinian Laith al-Khaldi during his funeral procession at the Jalazoun refugee camp, near the West Bank city of Ramallah, on Aug. 1, 2015. An Israeli soldier shot Khaldi after he had been throwing rocks at a military post. This was during a relatively calm period, although almost two dozen Palestinians were killed during the first half of the year. Nasser Nasser/AP hide caption

toggle caption Nasser Nasser/AP

In The Israeli-Palestinian Conflict, Even Calm Is Deadly

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/489612597/490037637" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Ameera, 6, walks with assistance at the Craig Joint Theater Hospital at Bagram Airfield, Afghanistan. She is recovering from a gunshot wound sustained when she was caught in a firefight between U.S. and Afghan soldiers and Taliban insurgents. Senior Airman Robert Dantzler/U.S. Air Force hide caption

toggle caption Senior Airman Robert Dantzler/U.S. Air Force

Ameera, A 6-Year-Old Afghan, Prepares To Walk Out Of U.S. Military Hospital

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/487796397/487815098" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A cyclist looks at the flowers and messages placed along the beach for victims of the recent terrorist attack in Nice, France, on Wednesday. The recent spate of attacks around the world has raised questions about the limits of counterterrorism. Claude Paris/AP hide caption

toggle caption Claude Paris/AP

A Summer Of Terrorism Points To The Limits Of Counterterrorism

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/487066769/487237278" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Turkish Land Forces commander Salih Zeki Colak (right), naval commander Admiral Bulent Bostanoglu (second right) and air force commander Abidin Unal (left) attend a funeral in Ankara on July 18 for police officers killed during the failed July 15 coup attempt. Adem Altan/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Adem Altan/AFP/Getty Images

After Failed Coup, How Will Turkey's Military Cope With All Its Challenges?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/487064955/487151579" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Forensic experts examine the wreckage of a car that exploded, killing prominent investigative journalist Pavel Sheremet, in Kiev, Ukraine, on Wednesday. Efrem Lukatsky/AP hide caption

toggle caption Efrem Lukatsky/AP

People wave Turkish flags Tuesday as they gather in Taksim Square in Istanbul, protesting against the attempted coup last Friday. The Turkish government accelerated its crackdown on alleged plotters of the failed coup against President Recep Tayyip Erdogan. Emrah Gurel/AP hide caption

toggle caption Emrah Gurel/AP

Turkey's Post-Coup-Attempt Purge Widens As Arrests And Firings Grow

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/486624842/486646247" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Syrian President Bashar Assad (white shirt) speaks with Syrian troops in the suburbs of Damascus on June 26, in a photo released by the official SANA news agency. The U.S. and Russia are working on a proposal to coordinate their bombing campaigns in Syria, where the two powers are fighting the Islamic State and other Islamist extremists. SANA via AP hide caption

toggle caption SANA via AP

Syrian women and children stage a protest against the government's siege of Daraya, outside Damascus, on March 9. The protesters demanded that President Bashar Assad's government allow humanitarian aid into the city. Anadolu Agency/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Anadolu Agency/Getty Images

The Siege That Keeps A Rebel Town In Syria Desperate For Food Aid

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/484946410/485740622" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

An Afghan soldier stands at a mortar training range near Kandahar, Afghanistan. The Afghan forces are still receiving help from the U.S. as they battle the Taliban. This photo was taken by NPR's David Gilkey shortly before he was killed by the Taliban on June 5. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

toggle caption David Gilkey/NPR

Afghanistan: A Tragic Return To A War With No End

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/483839687/484987336" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Family members and friends of the victims of the Istanbul attack paid tribute at a memorial service Thursday at Ataturk Airport. Turkish authorities say the evidence points to three Russian-speaking suicide bombers who were part of the Islamic State. Emrah Gurel/AP hide caption

toggle caption Emrah Gurel/AP

Turkey's President Recep Tayyip Erdogan speaks on Monday at the presidential palace in Ankara. Turkey is now embroiled in conflicts with Syria's President Bashar Assad, the Islamic State and the Kurdish separatists. Murat Cetinmuhurdar/AP hide caption

toggle caption Murat Cetinmuhurdar/AP

Tashfeen Malik (left) pledged allegiance to the Islamic State on Facebook just before she and her husband, Syed Farook, went on a shooting spree that left 14 dead in San Bernardino, Calif., last December. The couple is shown here in a 2014 photo. In just over a year, three separate attackers have declared support for ISIS as they carried out shootings in the U.S. AP hide caption

toggle caption AP

Syrian President Bashar Assad addresses parliament in Damascus on Tuesday, saying he will retake "every inch" of Syrian territory. Assad's defiant tone comes at a time when peace efforts for the country have been crumbling. SANA via AP hide caption

toggle caption SANA via AP

Bashar Assad's Defiance Points To A Syrian Peace Effort In Tatters

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/481284040/481351359" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Young boys wave smoldering tin cans at cars in Kabul, Afghanistan. The smoke from the seeds inside the cans is believed to ward off evil. Zabihullah Tamanna for NPR hide caption

toggle caption Zabihullah Tamanna for NPR

'He Had A Great Eye For A Story'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/480944325/480989036" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A member of the Afghan army looks on as an artillery gun fires at Taliban fighters in the hills of Nangahar Province, in eastern Afghanistan, in 2015. NPR photographer David Gilkey, who was killed Sunday, embedded with the Afghan military on multiple occasions to see how it was faring in its fight against the Taliban. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

toggle caption David Gilkey/NPR

An Afghan commando stands on the tarmac, wearing night vision gear. The elite commandos are about to fly into an area controlled by Taliban fighters. Their mission: to sweep a village for Taliban fighters. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

toggle caption David Gilkey/NPR

Under U.S. Air Cover, Afghan Commandos Chase The Elusive Taliban

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/480149634/480397655" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

U.S. Air Force Lt. Col. Chance Henderson, an orthopedic surgeon, stands in the operating theater of the military hospital at Bagram Airfield in Afghanistan. Henderson is fighting to save the leg of a 6-year-old Afghan girl who was shot during a firefight between U.S. and Afghan forces and the Taliban. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

toggle caption David Gilkey/NPR

Saving 6-Year-Old Ameera, Shot In An Afghan Firefight

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/479190244/479349693" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Images of dead bodies in Syrian prisons, taken by a Syrian forensic photographer, were displayed at the United Nations last year. They were also put on exhibit at the U.S. Capitol last July. A range of activists and groups are trying to find better ways to document torture and prosecute those responsible. Lucas Jackson/Reuters hide caption

toggle caption Lucas Jackson/Reuters

Documenting Torture: Doctors Search For New Ways To Gather Evidence

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/479128985/479128986" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A mural on the wall of the boys' high school in Sair, a Palestinian town in the West Bank. More than a dozen young men from Sair were killed by Israeli forces since last fall, including during attacks on Israelis. Emily Harris/NPR hide caption

toggle caption Emily Harris/NPR

A Fall In Knife Attacks On Israelis, Amid A Shifting Palestinian Mood

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/477919690/478148995" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript