Many Stories, One World

Taxis wait in London in June 2014. By law, the drivers of London's black cabs must memorize all of the city's streets, a process that takes years of study. The taxi drivers are opposed to Uber and drivers using a GPS, but the High Court ruled in favor of Uber last week. Oli Scarff/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Oli Scarff/Getty Images

A Gwadar fisherman relaxes as the sun goes down. Abdul Sattar for NPR hide caption

toggle caption Abdul Sattar for NPR

U.S. Commerce Secretary Penny Pritzker (in blue jacket), visits the container port at the Special Enterprise Zone in Mariel, Cuba, on Oct. 6. Cuba is creating the zone to encourage trade and foreign investment. Some foreign companies are eager to move in, though the Pritzker said Cuba's commitment to free trade was not year clear. Ramon Espinosa/AP hide caption

toggle caption Ramon Espinosa/AP

A state-owned company started building "Liquor City" in a suburb of Luliang to help diversify the economy away from coal. But a massive anti-corruption campaign has damaged demand for expensive Chinese baijiu, or white liquor, and for now, the factory complex remains unfinished. Frank Langfitt/NPR hide caption

toggle caption Frank Langfitt/NPR

Luliang is in recession, but developers continue to build apartment blocks even though demand for real estate is drying up. Frank Langfitt/NPR hide caption

toggle caption Frank Langfitt/NPR

A Chinese investor monitors stock prices at a brokerage in Beijing on Wednesday. The country's stock markets have nosedived. Ng Han Guan/AP hide caption

toggle caption Ng Han Guan/AP

Elderly residents gather in a dying village in the Sierra Francia region, northwest of Madrid. Lauren Frayer for NPR hide caption

toggle caption Lauren Frayer for NPR

Russian workers threw contraband peaches off a truck outside the city of Novozybkov on Aug. 7. AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption AFP/Getty Images

The Port of Hamburg's trade volume has more than doubled since 1990 and is projected to double again by 2030. Andrew Schneider for NPR hide caption

toggle caption Andrew Schneider for NPR

A worker picks clingstone peaches in Greece. Most of the country's farms are small and family owned. Production costs can be high, and Greek farmers have had trouble competing internationally. Konstantinos Tsakalidis/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Konstantinos Tsakalidis/Bloomberg via Getty Images

The state-run Iran-Khodro plant manufactures vehicles including the Peugeot 206 car, shown on a production line in 2014 near Tehran. Iran's robust auto industry was built in response to sanctions. Ebrahim Noroozi/AP hide caption

toggle caption Ebrahim Noroozi/AP

Iranian stockbrokers monitor share prices at the Tehran Stock Exchange in April. The historical Iran nuclear deal could open the country's market up to international investors. Vahid Salemi/AP hide caption

toggle caption Vahid Salemi/AP

Shoppers make their way in a Tehran bazaar. Once international sanctions are lifted, $100 billion from Iranian oil sales will be released from escrow accounts. Vahid Salemi/AP hide caption

toggle caption Vahid Salemi/AP

Greek Finance Minister Euclid Tsakalotos attends a session of Parliament in Athens on Wednesday as lawmakers prepared to vote on reforms demanded by eurozone creditors in exchange for a new bailout. Aris Messinis/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Aris Messinis/AFP/Getty Images

The drachma was Greece's currency before it joined the eurozone in 2001. There's now talk that Greece could leave the euro and return to its old currency, though economists say the transition would be difficult and the drachma would likely be extremely weak. Christopher Furlong/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Christopher Furlong/Getty Images

Greek supporters of the "no" vote celebrate at Syntagma Square in Athens on Sunday night after the results were announced. Greeks overwhelmingly rejected the demands of creditors for more austerity in return for rescue loans. But the country has no clear way out of its financial crisis. Petr David Josek/AP hide caption

toggle caption Petr David Josek/AP

A Greek demonstrator urges a "no" vote in Sunday's referendum on whether Greece should accept international demands for additional financial austerity. He is holding an old 1,000 Greek drachma bank note during a rally in the northern Greek port city of Thessaloniki on Monday. Some Greeks say the country should leave the eurozone and go back to the drachma. Giannis Papanikos/AP hide caption

toggle caption Giannis Papanikos/AP

Some 800 migrants from the Middle East arrive at the Greek port of Piraeus on Sunday. Smugglers are charging thousands of dollars to take migrants across the Mediterranean, and prices can vary widely. Children are often allowed to travel for free. Anadolu Agency/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Anadolu Agency/Getty Images

Pots with genetically modified male Aedes aegypti mosquitoes are pictured before they are released in Piracicaba, Brazil in April. Paulo Whitaker /Reuters /Landov hide caption

toggle caption Paulo Whitaker /Reuters /Landov


Brazilians Take A Swing At Mosquitoes With The Zap Racket

The electrified tennis racket that kills mosquitoes is ubiquitous in Brazil. It's deeply deeply satisfying to use. But it does take technique.

Listen Loading… 2:41
  • Playlist
  • Download
  • Embed
    <iframe src="" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

The Hadera desalination plant is one of five built in Israel after a severe drought in the 1990s. Along with conservation efforts and water recycling, the plants have helped end Israel's chronic water shortages. Emily Harris/NPR hide caption

toggle caption Emily Harris/NPR

Miami swimwear entrepreneur Mel Valenzuela (right) explains online strategies to Cuban business owners Victor Rodriguez (middle) and Caridad Limonta (left) in Wynwood this month. Miami boutique owner Monica Minagorri (rear) watches. Tim Padgett/WLRN hide caption

toggle caption Tim Padgett/WLRN