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Shoppers make their way in a Tehran bazaar. Once international sanctions are lifted, $100 billion from Iranian oil sales will be released from escrow accounts. Vahid Salemi/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Vahid Salemi/AP

Greek Finance Minister Euclid Tsakalotos attends a session of Parliament in Athens on Wednesday as lawmakers prepared to vote on reforms demanded by eurozone creditors in exchange for a new bailout. Aris Messinis/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Aris Messinis/AFP/Getty Images

The drachma was Greece's currency before it joined the eurozone in 2001. There's now talk that Greece could leave the euro and return to its old currency, though economists say the transition would be difficult and the drachma would likely be extremely weak. Christopher Furlong/Getty Images hide caption

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Greek supporters of the "no" vote celebrate at Syntagma Square in Athens on Sunday night after the results were announced. Greeks overwhelmingly rejected the demands of creditors for more austerity in return for rescue loans. But the country has no clear way out of its financial crisis. Petr David Josek/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Petr David Josek/AP

A Greek demonstrator urges a "no" vote in Sunday's referendum on whether Greece should accept international demands for additional financial austerity. He is holding an old 1,000 Greek drachma bank note during a rally in the northern Greek port city of Thessaloniki on Monday. Some Greeks say the country should leave the eurozone and go back to the drachma. Giannis Papanikos/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Giannis Papanikos/AP

Some 800 migrants from the Middle East arrive at the Greek port of Piraeus on Sunday. Smugglers are charging thousands of dollars to take migrants across the Mediterranean, and prices can vary widely. Children are often allowed to travel for free. Anadolu Agency/Getty Images hide caption

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Pots with genetically modified male Aedes aegypti mosquitoes are pictured before they are released in Piracicaba, Brazil in April. Paulo Whitaker /Reuters /Landov hide caption

itoggle caption Paulo Whitaker /Reuters /Landov

The Hadera desalination plant is one of five built in Israel after a severe drought in the 1990s. Along with conservation efforts and water recycling, the plants have helped end Israel's chronic water shortages. Emily Harris/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Emily Harris/NPR

Miami swimwear entrepreneur Mel Valenzuela (right) explains online strategies to Cuban business owners Victor Rodriguez (middle) and Caridad Limonta (left) in Wynwood this month. Miami boutique owner Monica Minagorri (rear) watches. Tim Padgett/WLRN hide caption

itoggle caption Tim Padgett/WLRN

Nouf al-Mazrou, with the red head scarf in the center, runs a barbeque catering business from her home in the Saudi capital Riyadh. She's shown here at a gathering of Saudi women who have launched businesses on Instagram. The event was held at a private girls school. Deborah Amos / NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Deborah Amos / NPR

One of the first homes going up on land bought and sold as part of a Canadian-Palestinian investment firm's effort to properly register plots. Much land in the West Bank is not registered and has no title deed, creating problems for economic development. Emily Harris/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Emily Harris/NPR

Money is pouring into the stock market, but most new investors only have a middle-school education, says Texas A&M University economist Gan Li. Frank Langfitt/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Frank Langfitt/NPR

Passengers go to the Nanchang railway station in eastern China in February 2014, at the end of the Chinese New Year holiday. In the past, it was often the only time of year that migrant workers were able to return home. Now, economic pressures on factories in coastal China have led to a reversal of a decades-long migration of workers from inland to the coast. Zhou Ke/Xinhua/Landov hide caption

itoggle caption Zhou Ke/Xinhua/Landov

The view west from London's newest skyscraper looks over the River Thames and St. Paul's Cathedral. Russians have flocked to the English property and banking sectors as the economy crumbles back home. Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images

Language instructor Soh Bor-am teaches eight Mandarin classes a day, as Chinese tourism to South Korea swells. Elise Hu/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Elise Hu/NPR

A Palestinian family leaves the visitors center at Rawabi. Tanya Habjouqa for NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Tanya Habjouqa for NPR

A platform owned by Mexico's state-run oil company Pemex is seen off the Bay of Campeche in the Gulf of Mexico. The country has recently opened up its energy sector to foreign investors. Victor Ruiz/Reuters/Landov hide caption

itoggle caption Victor Ruiz/Reuters/Landov

Renewable energy sources — such as the Eolo wind park about 75 miles south of the Nicaraguan capital, Managua — generate about half of the country's electricity. Officials predict that figure could rise to 80 percent within years. Inti Ocon/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Inti Ocon/AFP/Getty Images

A worker at Soulis Furs in Kastoria sorts through treated mink pelts. "We buy the pelts — minks or foxes or other animals — from North America and Scandinavia and send them for treatment in factories or abroad," says Makis Gioras of Soulis Furs in Kastoria. Joanna Kakissis/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Joanna Kakissis/NPR

Shoppers queue outside the supermarket 'Dia a Dia' in Caracas, Venezuela, on Tuesday. The government took over stores of supermarket chain after alleging that it was hoarding food. According to many economists, government controls are making the economic crisis worse. Miguel Gutierrez/EPA/Landov hide caption

itoggle caption Miguel Gutierrez/EPA/Landov

Nina Galata displays her smartphone equipped with a card reader to accept donations and payment for Situation Stockholm, a magazine sold by Stockholm's homeless. Jonas Ekstromer/TT/AFP/Getty hide caption

itoggle caption Jonas Ekstromer/TT/AFP/Getty