Despite cloudy weather, beaches are packed in Brighton, England. With airfares rising and the British pound down after the Brexit vote, some Britons are vacationing closer to home. Lauren Frayer for NPR hide caption

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For Post-Brexit British Vacationers, Staying Home Now Seems Appealing

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For Venezuela's 'Millionaire' Contestants, Winnings Amount To A Few Bucks

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Anna Woydyla of Poland has lived in Britain for 11 years and works at a London restaurant. Many workers from EU countries are struggling with uncertainty about their future in Britain after the Brexit vote. Pawel Kuczynski/AP hide caption

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After Brexit, Uncertainty Over Status Of EU Workers Living In U.K.

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The Brexit vote has raised questions about the fate of the Port Talbot Works, Britain's largest surviving steel plant, located in Wales. Paul Ellis/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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This Steel Town Voted For Brexit. Now Its Jobs Are In Jeopardy

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Traders at work at ETX Capital work in central London on Monday. Financial markets in the U.K. and around the world have been in turmoil since the Brexit vote last week. Daniel Leal-Olivas/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Brexit Makes Investors Nervous, But U.K. Recession Isn't Certain

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President Obama speaks at the SelectUSA Investment Summit in Washington, D.C., on Monday. Concerns about a possible "Brexit" were floating in the air as British investors met with state economic teams at the two-day summit. Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP hide caption

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Aberystwyth lies in a cove along the Welsh coast and looks out toward Ireland. Aberystwyth is part of an area that YouGov, the on-line polling company, says is the most EU-friendly region in the United Kingdom. Frank Langfitt/NPR hide caption

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From London To The Welsh Coast, Sharp Disagreements On 'Brexit'

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Jamie Dimon, head of JPMorgan Chase, recently warned of potential job losses in the United Kingdom if the U.K. votes to leave the European Union. Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Big U.S. Companies Are Weighing In On This Week's 'Brexit' Vote, Too

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Tiny Luxembourg has the highest per capita income of all 28 EU member states. Art Silverman/NPR hide caption

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The View From Luxembourg, Where A 'Brexit' Is Unthinkable

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A stately Georgian house at 29 Harley Street is home to Formations House, a company that specializes in creating other companies. Lauren Frayer/NPR hide caption

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1 Address, 2,000 Companies, And The Ease Of Doing Business In The U.K.

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The Chinese company Fuling Plastic set up a plant in Allentown, Pa., last year. The company, which makes straws and other plastic products, supplies fast food chains. Chinese companies are expected to invest about $30 billion in the U.S. this year, doubling the record set last year. Jackie Northam/NPR hide caption

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China Ramps Up U.S. Investments, From Straws To Semiconductors

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The head of the Panama Canal Authority, Jorge Quijano, center, opens the main valve to allow water into the flood chambers on the new set of locks on the Atlantic side of the Panama Canal in June 2015. The expansion of the canal, making it wider and deeper to accommodate larger ships, has taken nearly a decade. It opens next month. Tito Herrera/AP hide caption

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A Wider, Deeper Panama Canal Prepares To Open Its Locks

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Panama's economy, expected to grow by 6 percent this year, is a bright spot in Latin America. Many Panamanians believe their country has been unfairly tarnished by the Panama Papers revelations. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Panama Papers Fallout Hurts A Reputation Panama Thought It Had Fixed

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Fillets of salmon, salted and smoked by H. Forman & Son, are destined for the U.S. grocery chain Whole Foods. Rich Preston/NPR hide caption

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Backing 'Brexit,' A Salmon Smokehouse Says It's Been Swimming Upstream

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A worker leaves the Baosteel Group Corporation plant in Shanghai in March 2016. Johannes Eisele/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Starbucks And Steel: The Divergent Directions Of China's Economy

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Investors in Zhongjin, a wealth-management company that collapsed this month, demonstrate outside a police office in Shanghai's Hongkou district, demanding repayment of their funds. Police later detained one of the demonstrators for distributing protest T-shirts. Frank Langfitt/NPR hide caption

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Chinese Investors Reeling After Wealth Management Firm's Collapse

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People walk in front of Istanbul's Hagia Sophia on April 12. Turkey has seen tourist numbers plummet following a series of deadly terrorist attacks and a travel ban by Russia. Chris McGrath/Getty Images hide caption

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Terrorism Fears And Travel Bans Shake Tourism In Turkey

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Parakeets are among Colombia's 1,900 bird species. Alexander Schimmeck /Flickr hide caption

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As Colombia Grows Safer, Tourists — Especially Bird Lovers — Flock Back

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A foreign fishing boat that was caught in Indonesian territorial waters is blown up by Indonesian authorities in Kuala Langsa, Aceh Province on Tuesday. Indonesia sank more than 20 fishing boats Tuesday as part of a stepped up campaign against illegal fishing in its waters. Januar/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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About 40 percent of Russia's food is imported. As the value of the ruble has declined, prices at grocery stores have risen. Anadolu Agency/Getty Images hide caption

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In Russia, The Oil Price Drop Hits Putin's Base Hard

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The headquarters of the Bank of Venezuela (from left) and buildings housing the National Assembly and various government ministries stand in darkness in Caracas on March 22. Venezuela shut down for a week to conserve electricity amid a deepening power crisis. Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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In Venezuela, An Electricity Crisis Adds To Country's Woes

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