A rhino wakes up after its horn was trimmed at John Hume's Rhino Ranch in Klerksdorp, South Africa, on Feb. 3. South Africa's highest court is preparing to decide whether to uphold the country's domestic ban on trading rhino horn. John Hume is a private rhino owner and breeder who advocates for legalizing trade. Mujahid Safodien /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Mujahid Safodien /AFP/Getty Images

If South Africa Lifts The Ban On Trading Rhino Horns, Will Rhinos Benefit?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/488702186/489662014" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Drug counselor Gemma Bennet (left) explains to Rio Brown the results of forensic tests on a fragment of an Ecstasy pill he brought in for evaluation at The Loop. Lauren Frayer for NPR hide caption

toggle caption Lauren Frayer for NPR

Making Sure Ecstasy Is Ecstasy: Volunteers Test Drugs At U.K. Music Fests

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/488540144/488568472" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A typical apartment building in Roslyakovo. Russian President Vladimir Putin signed papers ordering the town to open its doors to the world on Jan. 1, 2015. Mary Louise Kelly/NPR hide caption

toggle caption Mary Louise Kelly/NPR

A Once-Closed Russian Military Town In The Arctic Opens To The World

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/488356877/488568454" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A view of the Russian Federal Security Services on Lubyanka Square in Moscow in 2013. Journalists, dissidents and human rights workers say they are often followed or harassed by the Russian spy service. Ivan Sekretarev/AP hide caption

toggle caption Ivan Sekretarev/AP

Was That A Russian Spy, Or Am I Getting Paranoid?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/487049242/487446750" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Kidlington is home to a number of 17th century cottages near its medieval church. This is the most historic part of the village, but it's not where the tourists went. Instead, tour buses dropped them off in a residential area built in the 1960s and '70s. Lauren Frayer for NPR hide caption

toggle caption Lauren Frayer for NPR

Why Did Busloads Of Asian Tourists Suddenly Arrive In This English Village?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/486650221/487729977" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

French flags are seen lowered at half-staff in Nice on July 16. The truck attack on July 14 killed 84 people. "I felt coming to celebrate on holiday and people are in mourning didn't seem right," one vacationer says. "But I'm glad I came." Valery Hache/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Valery Hache/AFP/Getty Images

In Nice, Residents And Tourists Struggle To Adjust After Attack

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/487021173/487237254" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Sylvia Poggioli holds her hard-earned new Italian driver's license. After intense cramming, she aced the exam. The total cost for driving school, exam and license fees came to nearly $700. Courtesy of Sylvia Poggioli/NPR hide caption

toggle caption Courtesy of Sylvia Poggioli/NPR

Letter From Rome: The Hardest Exam Is The Driving Test

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/484161437/484215947" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A woman builds a fire at a migrant camp on the Costa Rica-Panama border. The area has seen a recent surge of migrants coming from Africa, hoping to make it to the U.S. Rolando Arrieta/NPR hide caption

toggle caption Rolando Arrieta/NPR

Via Cargo Ships and Jungle Treks, Africans Dream Of Reaching The U.S.

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/483081488/483129599" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Nigel Farage, leader of the U.K. Independence Party, poses after placing a bet that Britain will vote to leave the European Union in Thursday's referendum known as the Brexit. Britain's bookmakers, who have done better than pollsters in recent British ballots, say the odds favor Britain staying in the E.U. Michael Tubi/Corbis via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Michael Tubi/Corbis via Getty Images

An angry man outside a grocery store argues with a policeman in Caracas, Venezuela, on June 8 amid the country's ongoing food shortages. After waiting for hours, customers began protesting, an increasingly common occurence in Venezuela, which is suffering a severe economic crisis. Fernando Llano/AP hide caption

toggle caption Fernando Llano/AP

As Food Crisis Worsens, Venezuelans Loot Almost-Empty Stores

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/482782426/482900230" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The eighth and ninth graders at a recent Unification Leader Camp in Jeju, South Korea, answer questions about their knowledge of their neighbors to the North. Elise Hu/NPR hide caption

toggle caption Elise Hu/NPR

Yes, There's A Summer Camp Dedicated To Learning About North Korea

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/482439785/482750965" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Cleaners in Rio de Janeiro collect debris from Guanabara Bay that washed up onto the beach last December. The bay, which will host sailing events at the Olympics in August, is heavily polluted. Yasuyoshi Chiba/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Yasuyoshi Chiba/AFP/Getty Images

For Olympic Sailors And Fishermen Alike, Rio's Dirty Bay Sets Off Alarms

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/482458856/482521427" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Flight deck crew members position F/A-18 jet fighters for a launch from the USS Truman aircraft carrier stationed in the eastern Mediterranean. The crew members wear different colored jerseys to identify their tasks. Sylvia Poggioli/NPR hide caption

toggle caption Sylvia Poggioli/NPR

Even As It Heads Home, Aircraft Carrier Plays Key Role Fighting ISIS

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/482146050/482521451" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A Dundee marmalade jar (left) is among items recently unearthed from a 19th century landfill behind a manor house in East Anglia. In Victorian England, people transitioned from making most things at home to buying them in stores. Rich Preston/NPR hide caption

toggle caption Rich Preston/NPR

Digging Up The Roots Of Modern Waste In Victorian-Era Rubbish

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/480268469/480335773" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Syria's Mohammed Faris was a national hero after he became the country's first cosmonaut in 1987, traveling to the Soviet Union's Mir Space Station. Now he's a refugee in Istanbul, Turkey. Faris, 65, is shown standing in front of a painting of himself as a cosmonaut. A critic of Syria's President Bashar Assad, he still hopes to return to his homeland. Peter Kenyon / NPR hide caption

toggle caption Peter Kenyon / NPR

Once A National Hero, Syria's Lone Cosmonaut Is Now A Refugee In Turkey

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/480041357/480100356" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A man uses a vegetable container to carry currency notes in a market in Caracas on May 21. Amid a crushing economic crisis and triple-digit inflation, Venezuela's bolivar has lost so much value that the largest bill, the 100-bolivar note, is now worth less than a dime on the black market. Anadolu Agency/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Anadolu Agency/Getty Images

Kikue Takagi, left, narrowly survived the Hiroshima atomic bombing as a schoolgirl. She's now 83. Her second cousin is U.S. Rep. Mark Takano, a Democrat from southern California. His grandparents and parents were all placed in U.S. internment camps in World War II. In this photo from last year, they are at a restaurant in Hiroshima, where he visited her. Courtesy of Mark Takano hide caption

toggle caption Courtesy of Mark Takano

A boat approaches Ghoramara island in India's Sundarbans. Most traffic goes the other way, as thousands of Ghoramara residents have left the flood-prone island in recent years. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

toggle caption David Gilkey/NPR

The Vanishing Islands Of India's Sundarbans

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/478393443/478886201" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Nguyen Thanh Phu delivers a presentation to children on the dangers of active land mines and bombs in Dong Ha, Vietnam. Michael Sullivan for NPR hide caption

toggle caption Michael Sullivan for NPR

Teaching Kids In Vietnam To Avoid A Deadly, Everyday Legacy Of War

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/479156321/479349675" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Ambadas Raut uses copper rods known as dowsing sticks to locate sources of underground water in a dry reservoir. He's had 400 clients and says he's found water for 80 percent of them. Julie McCarthy/NPR hide caption

toggle caption Julie McCarthy/NPR

Are Indians Turning To The 'Supernatural' In Subterranean Search For Water?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/478854808/479048534" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Egyptians pray for the victims of EgyptAir Flight 804 at Al-Thawrah Mosque in Cairo on Friday. The Egyptian military said it had found some wreckage of the plane, which was carrying 66 people when it went down early Thursday over the Mediterranean Sea. Amr Nabil/AP hide caption

toggle caption Amr Nabil/AP

'What Can You Say?' An Egyptian Man Mourns The Loss Of 4 Loved Ones

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/478852744/478886189" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript