Postcards : Parallels Our correspondents roam the world in search of fascinating people and places. When they find them, with a GPS or by pure serendipity, we tell those stories.

Gurmeet Ram Rahim Singh, shown here in 2007, was sentenced to 20 years in prison on Monday. The India Today Group/India Today Group/Getty Images hide caption

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The India Today Group/India Today Group/Getty Images

After 'Guru Of Bling' Sentencing, Indian State Stays On Alert For Violence

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An English couple on vacation in Greece composed this note, rolled it up in a bottle and, on July 4, tossed it into the Mediterranean Sea. A Palestinian fisherman caught it in his net this week. Photo Courtesy of Wael Al Soltan hide caption

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Photo Courtesy of Wael Al Soltan

From Greece, A Message In A Bottle Reaches Isolated Gaza

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The Paris municipality opened the Canal De L'Ourcq to swimmers this summer. Mayor Anne Hidalgo wants to open three pools on the Seine River by 2024, when the city is scheduled to host the Olympics. Joanna Kakissis/NPR hide caption

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Joanna Kakissis/NPR

Malala cuts a birthday cake in the shape of a book at a restaurant in Dohuk. The youngest Nobel laureate turned 20 on July 12 in Dohuk,€“ five years after she was shot in the head by a Taliban gunman in Pakistan. Jane Arraf/NPR hide caption

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Jane Arraf/NPR

For Malala, Now 20, Birthdays Are Best Spent With Girls Who Dream Big

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The George Hotel, a 17th century stagecoach inn, is one of the few historic buildings on Crawley's main street. Most of the town was built after World War II to house people displaced by bombing in London. In recent years, immigrants settled in Crawley and work at Gatwick Airport nearby. Lauren Frayer/NPR hide caption

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Lauren Frayer/NPR

A Year After Vote, Brexit Supporters In A British Town Wonder If It'll Ever Happen

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Elise Tries Engay food. Illustration by CJ Riculan/NPR hide caption

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Illustration by CJ Riculan/NPR

Video: Japan Created Easy-To-Swallow Foods To Prevent Senior Choking Deaths

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A shelter sign is displayed at the entrance to a subway station in Seoul on Wednesday, a day after North Korea tested an intercontinental ballistic missile. Subway stations are designated as shelters in case of aerial bombardment, part of the city's response to the threat posed by North Korea. But many Seoul residents take the threat in stride. Ed Jones/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Ed Jones/AFP/Getty Images

Calm In Seoul As The North Korea Question Grows More Urgent

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Thousands gather to celebrate Liberation Day in Shyira, Rwanda. Twenty-three years ago, a rebel army led by Paul Kagame, now the president, marched into Kigali to end a genocide against the Tutsi minority. Eyder Peralta/NPR hide caption

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Eyder Peralta/NPR

In Rwanda, July 4 Isn't Independence Day — It's Liberation Day

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Academpark is the technology park in Akademgorodok, a Siberian suburb that's Russia's answer to Silicon Valley. Lucian Kim/NPR hide caption

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Lucian Kim/NPR

In Russia's Siberian Silicon Valley, Business Is Good But Risks Can Be High

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Elise Tries purikura, the original Snapchat. Illustration by CJ Riculan/NPR hide caption

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Illustration by CJ Riculan/NPR

Video: Japan's 'Purikura' Photo Booths Offer Snapchat-Like Filters

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Over the years, Beijing has tightened its political grip over Hong Kong, a city of more than 7 million people, and income inequality has risen. Rob Schmitz/NPR hide caption

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Rob Schmitz/NPR

20 Years After Handover, Hong Kong Residents Reflect On Life Under Chinese Rule

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Elise Tries dancing to K-pop. It's harder than it looks. Illustration by CJ Riculan/NPR hide caption

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Illustration by CJ Riculan/NPR

Video: K-Pop Dance Routines Are A Workout For Body And Brain

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When reporting from Moscow, NPR's Mary Louise Kelly was typing when the cursor began to jump around on its own. Konstantin Leyfer/TASS via Getty Images hide caption

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Konstantin Leyfer/TASS via Getty Images

Elise tries robo toilets in Japan. Illustration by CJ Riculan/NPR hide caption

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Illustration by CJ Riculan/NPR

WATCH: What Makes Japan No. 1 In Toilet Technology

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Elise Tries pore vacuuming in South Korea. Illustration by CJ Riculan/NPR hide caption

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Illustration by CJ Riculan/NPR

Video: That Time We Tried Pore Vacuuming In South Korea

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Ephraim Bluth, originally from New York, stands in the yard of his home in the West Bank settlement of Neve Tzuf, also known as Halamish. Daniel Estrin /NPR hide caption

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Daniel Estrin /NPR

After Six-Day War, An American Became A West Bank Settler

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The first lady, born Melanija Knavs, is from the town of Sevnica in central Slovenia. Before 2016, it was known for its underwear factory, salami festival and sport fishing. "Melania put us on the world map," says Mayor Srecko Ocvirk, who has helped lead a Melania-themed campaign to attract more tourists here. Joanna Kakissis for NPR hide caption

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Joanna Kakissis for NPR

For Melania Trump's Slovenian Hometown, First Lady's Fame Is Good For Business

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Illustration by CJ Riculan/NPR

Video: Animal Cafes Are Cool, But Does A Raccoon Cafe Go Too Far?

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Amateur K-pop dancers perform at a presidential campaign rally for Moon Jae-in, the candidate for Korea's Democratic Party, in Seoul on Saturday. Courtesy of Moon Jae-in Campaign hide caption

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Courtesy of Moon Jae-in Campaign

Parade Floats And Altered K-Pop Songs Mark South Korea's Coming Election

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The China-Korea Friendship Bridge crosses the Yalu River from Dandong into North Korea. Seventy percent of North Korea's trade passes over the bridge. Rob Schmitz/NPR hide caption

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Rob Schmitz/NPR

A Chinese Border City Gives Tourists A Glimpse Of Life In North Korea

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