Kyrgyz girls slide plastic jugs back to their family's camp after chopping a hole in a frozen spring to fetch water. Men handle herding and trading; much of the hard labor of daily life falls to the females. Matthieu Paley/National Geographic hide caption

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Matthieu Paley/National Geographic

"I drove out past the town of Marion beneath a quiet sky, as beautiful as anything I'd seen, to the house of a woman who lived by herself." 1969 Eugene Richards/Magnum Photos hide caption

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Eugene Richards/Magnum Photos

Looking For Lost Memories In The Delta

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The giant sequoia is a snow tree, says scientist Steve Sillett, adapted for long winters in the Sierra Nevada. But it's a fire tree, too. Thick bark protects it from burning in lightning-caused fires, which open cones and clear the understory, allowing saplings to find light and prosper. Michael Nichols/National Geographic hide caption

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Michael Nichols/National Geographic

A worker emerges from one of hundreds of smuggling tunnels that connect the Gaza Strip and Egypt. Paolo Pellegrin/National Geographic hide caption

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Paolo Pellegrin/National Geographic

"A sculpture like this can take a master carver years to produce. Front and center are the popular Taoist gods Shou, Lu and Fu — symbols of long life, money, and luck. 'We hope — no, we insist — we can continue to protect these skills,' says Wang Shan, secretary-general of the China Arts and Crafts Association." Brent Stirton/National Geographic hide caption

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Brent Stirton/National Geographic

A white rhino cow (left) grazes with a bull that has become her companion after a poaching attack in KwaZulu-Natal Province, South Africa. Brent Stirton/National Geographic hide caption

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Brent Stirton/National Geographic

A Way To Save The Rhino, Just Not Its Horn

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Sulfur and algae turn hot springs into pools of living color. The water is condensation from hot gases rising from magma chambers. As the water evaporates, salts and minerals form a vivid crust. George Steinmetz/National Geographic hide caption

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George Steinmetz/National Geographic

Marta (left) and Emma. The 15-year-old sisters want to go to the same university and become opera singers. They both like to draw but have a different approach to their art. Marta depicts finely detailed faces, while Emma prefers more expansive images: the sky, the rain, objects in motion. Martin Schoeller/National Geographic hide caption

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Martin Schoeller/National Geographic

Dara Arista, 8, holds a photo of Sheila in front of the tiger's cage at the zoo in Jambi, Indonesia. Poachers had slaughtered Sheila during the night. Steve Winter/National Geographic hide caption

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Steve Winter/National Geographic

Listen to a Tiger Call for Her Mate (Hans Weise, National Geographic)

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