Undersea Images : The Picture Show There are many benefits to sharing a large room with NPR's music team, one being the sundry wall hangings. Above my desk, for example, hangs a poster for Animal Collective's new album. The best part: It's basically a large, kaleidoscopic print of ...
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Undersea Images

There are many benefits to sharing a large room with NPR's music team, one being the sundry wall hangings. Above my desk, for example, hangs a poster for Animal Collective's new album. The best part: It's basically a large, kaleidoscopic print of David Doubilet's underwater photography. I stared at this image for weeks before thinking to contact the photographer.

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Doubilet is well-known in the industry; his images have been published in National Geographic as well as in his own publications. At the seasoned age of 12, he began taking underwater photographs with a Brownie Hawkeye camera in a rubber bag—a regular Jacques Cousteau. Through the years he has become a master, if not the master.

These images are taken from a series called Human Elements. Although most of his imagery features sea flora and fauna, this particular series takes a look at how humans interact with the mysterious underwater universe. Doubilet works magic with light, which is hard enough to do on land, and the colors are, well, otherworldly. Take a look at his work, best viewed full-screen.

All images (c) David Doubilet, Undersea Images Inc.