Editor's Pick

NPR's David Gilkey Named Photographer Of The Year By WHNPA

NPR is pleased to announce that our very own David Gilkey has been named Photographer of the Year by the White House News Photographers Association, in its annual "Eyes of History" contest. One of the oldest and most prestigious showcases of visual journalism in the country, the competition recognizes excellence in still, multimedia, and video photography. Gilkey's coverage of Haiti and Afghanistan earned him nine other awards in the still-image contest. Here is a selection from his winning portfolio.

Advisory: This gallery contains graphic content not suited for all audiences.

  • Looters carry away a stolen mirror, which shows the reflection of local police standing on the streets in downtown Port-au-Prince, Haiti. Looting and violence raged in the commercial district of the Haitian capital after the devastating Jan.12., 2010, earthquake. In many cases, the police gave up on chasing people out of the area.
    Hide caption
    Looters carry away a stolen mirror, which shows the reflection of local police standing on the streets in downtown Port-au-Prince, Haiti. Looting and violence raged in the commercial district of the Haitian capital after the devastating Jan.12., 2010, earthquake. In many cases, the police gave up on chasing people out of the area.
    David Gilkey/NPR
  • A man carrying a shotgun walks through a collapsed burning building while trying to keep looters at bay on the streets outside in the commercial district of downtown Port-au-Prince. With little police presence in the aftermath of the quake, looters and scavengers ransacked destroyed buildings.
    Hide caption
    A man carrying a shotgun walks through a collapsed burning building while trying to keep looters at bay on the streets outside in the commercial district of downtown Port-au-Prince. With little police presence in the aftermath of the quake, looters and scavengers ransacked destroyed buildings.
    David Gilkey/NPR
  • Morgue workers walk among the thousands of bodies piled up at the National Hospital in downtown Port-au-Prince. The earthquake left the Haitian capital almost totally destroyed, killing hundreds of thousands and overwhelming the morgue facilities with victims.
    Hide caption
    Morgue workers walk among the thousands of bodies piled up at the National Hospital in downtown Port-au-Prince. The earthquake left the Haitian capital almost totally destroyed, killing hundreds of thousands and overwhelming the morgue facilities with victims.
    David Gilkey/NPR
  • A woman collapses in anguish in front of the destroyed cathedral in Port-au-Prince. Hundreds gathered for the funeral of Archbishop Msgr. Joseph Serge Miot, who was killed along with Bishop Charles Benoit, the city's vicar general, and scores of Cathedral Notre Dame parishioners.
    Hide caption
    A woman collapses in anguish in front of the destroyed cathedral in Port-au-Prince. Hundreds gathered for the funeral of Archbishop Msgr. Joseph Serge Miot, who was killed along with Bishop Charles Benoit, the city's vicar general, and scores of Cathedral Notre Dame parishioners.
    David Gilkey/NPR
  • A man grips a knife as he watches for other looters to come out of a shop near downtown Port-au-Prince.
    Hide caption
    A man grips a knife as he watches for other looters to come out of a shop near downtown Port-au-Prince.
    David Gilkey/NPR
  • Supporters of Michel Martelly, who failed to qualify for an election runoff, run from tear gas being fired at them by United Nations soldiers in Petionville, a suburb of Port-au Prince. Thousands of protesters rampaged through the streets of Haiti's capital to contest the election results.
    Hide caption
    Supporters of Michel Martelly, who failed to qualify for an election runoff, run from tear gas being fired at them by United Nations soldiers in Petionville, a suburb of Port-au Prince. Thousands of protesters rampaged through the streets of Haiti's capital to contest the election results.
    David Gilkey/NPR
  • Corpse collectors spray bleach on a 3-year-old boy's body after he died from cholera. The year ended in Haiti as it began, with the burying of the dead, as cholera claimed the lives of hundreds of people while thousands of people were hospitalized across the country with symptoms including serious diarrhea, vomiting and fever.
    Hide caption
    Corpse collectors spray bleach on a 3-year-old boy's body after he died from cholera. The year ended in Haiti as it began, with the burying of the dead, as cholera claimed the lives of hundreds of people while thousands of people were hospitalized across the country with symptoms including serious diarrhea, vomiting and fever.
    David Gilkey/NPR
  • New soldiers arrive at the reception station at the U.S. Army Training Center at Fort Jackson in Columbia, S.C., where they start their military careers with the traditional haircut during the first four days of in-processing.
    Hide caption
    New soldiers arrive at the reception station at the U.S. Army Training Center at Fort Jackson in Columbia, S.C., where they start their military careers with the traditional haircut during the first four days of in-processing.
    David Gilkey/NPR
  • Soldiers yell for help after enemy fighters shot at their patrol during a mock combat exercise, a part of basic training at Fort Jackson. The Army has said changes are necessary to update training for current conflicts and tailor programs to new recruits more used to playing video games than being out in the field.
    Hide caption
    Soldiers yell for help after enemy fighters shot at their patrol during a mock combat exercise, a part of basic training at Fort Jackson. The Army has said changes are necessary to update training for current conflicts and tailor programs to new recruits more used to playing video games than being out in the field.
    David Gilkey/NPR
  • Soldiers cheer and jeer for a private trying to make it over the highest wall of a climbing exercise and obstacle course.
    Hide caption
    Soldiers cheer and jeer for a private trying to make it over the highest wall of a climbing exercise and obstacle course.
    David Gilkey/NPR
  • Afghan soldiers patrol with U.S. soldiers near the village of Payendi Pashmul in Kandahar province. Afghan soldiers are working shoulder-to-shoulder with American troops, training to take the lead in the defense against insurgents.
    Hide caption
    Afghan soldiers patrol with U.S. soldiers near the village of Payendi Pashmul in Kandahar province. Afghan soldiers are working shoulder-to-shoulder with American troops, training to take the lead in the defense against insurgents.
    David Gilkey/NPR
  • Soldiers with Alpha Company 2-327 (TF No Slack) 1BCT of the 101st Airborne Division make a small fire to keep warm high up in the mountains on the border of Afghanistan and Pakistan. The soldiers were holding a security position for a downed aircraft rescue team working nearby.
    Hide caption
    Soldiers with Alpha Company 2-327 (TF No Slack) 1BCT of the 101st Airborne Division make a small fire to keep warm high up in the mountains on the border of Afghanistan and Pakistan. The soldiers were holding a security position for a downed aircraft rescue team working nearby.
    David Gilkey/NPR
  • American and Afghan special forces, along with Afghan commandos, train together not far from their base in southern Afghanistan. The highly trained special forces and commandos spend more time firing their weapons than any other Afghan or American units.
    Hide caption
    American and Afghan special forces, along with Afghan commandos, train together not far from their base in southern Afghanistan. The highly trained special forces and commandos spend more time firing their weapons than any other Afghan or American units.
    David Gilkey/NPR
  • Soldiers with Bravo Company, 101st Airborne Division, and their Afghan counterparts interrogate an Afghan farmer after undergoing attacks from insurgents in the village of Pashmul in Kandahar province. One of the toughest problems is discerning friend from foe. Even the Afghan soldiers have a hard time identifying who the enemy is.
    Hide caption
    Soldiers with Bravo Company, 101st Airborne Division, and their Afghan counterparts interrogate an Afghan farmer after undergoing attacks from insurgents in the village of Pashmul in Kandahar province. One of the toughest problems is discerning friend from foe. Even the Afghan soldiers have a hard time identifying who the enemy is.
    David Gilkey/NPR
  • Medic Paul Huston and Staff Sgt. Jaime Newman, of the 101st Airborne Division, work frantically to save Atiqullah Obaidullah, an Afghan National Army counterpart, who was shot in the head just seconds before by an insurgent sniper. American forces work closely with their Afghan counterparts and treat them as equal partners in the fight to secure the country.
    Hide caption
    Medic Paul Huston and Staff Sgt. Jaime Newman, of the 101st Airborne Division, work frantically to save Atiqullah Obaidullah, an Afghan National Army counterpart, who was shot in the head just seconds before by an insurgent sniper. American forces work closely with their Afghan counterparts and treat them as equal partners in the fight to secure the country.
    David Gilkey/NPR
  • Pvt. Cody Lee Ensley of Bravo Company, 101st Airborne Division, arrives back at Forward Operating Base JFM. Ensley's company and its Afghan counterparts fought a running gun battle for hours in the searing summer heat of Zhari district, in southern Afghanistan.
    Hide caption
    Pvt. Cody Lee Ensley of Bravo Company, 101st Airborne Division, arrives back at Forward Operating Base JFM. Ensley's company and its Afghan counterparts fought a running gun battle for hours in the searing summer heat of Zhari district, in southern Afghanistan.
    David Gilkey/NPR

1 of 16

View slideshow i

NPR took home 14 other awards in the contest's multimedia and video categories. You can see all the winning images and projects in the list below.

Comments

 

Please keep your community civil. All comments must follow the NPR.org Community rules and Terms of Use. NPR reserves the right to use the comments we receive, in whole or in part, and to use the commenter's name and location, in any medium. See also the Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Community FAQ.