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Looking Back At Iconic Iwo Jima

Sixty-seven years ago today, photographer Joe Rosenthal trekked up a mountain alongside U.S. Marines and snapped this indelible scene on the Japanese island of Iwo Jima. Oddly enough, he had been rejected from military service for his poor eyesight, but today his vision is iconic.

U.S. Marines of the 28th Regiment, 5th Division, raise the American flag atop Mount Suribachi at Iwo Jima, on Feb. 23, 1945. Joe Rosenthal/AP hide caption

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Joe Rosenthal/AP

U.S. Marines of the 28th Regiment, 5th Division, raise the American flag atop Mount Suribachi at Iwo Jima, on Feb. 23, 1945.

Joe Rosenthal/AP

Rosenthal received a Pulitzer the same year the photo was published, and the image was later re-created as the memorial statue that stands just outside of Arlington National Cemetery.

The rest of his career was dominated by that image, though he continued working at the San Francisco Chronicle until retiring in 1981. Rosenthal died in 2006 but is memorialized by what has become one of history's most iconic war photos.

U.S. Marines cheer after raising the American flag on Iwo Jima. Joe Rosenthal/AP hide caption

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Joe Rosenthal/AP