NPR logo We Have A ScuttleButton Winner!

We Have A ScuttleButton Winner!

The benefits of the worsening economy are obvious: More people found time to participate in last week's ScuttleButton puzzle than ever before. The bad news: There can be only one winner.

And the way you become that winner is by sending in the answer to the rebus. Just take one word or one concept per button, add 'em up, and you arrive at a saying or a name. And, don't forget, you can't win unless you send in both your name and your city/state.

What I failed to tell people — and this is my fault — is that the answer does not necessarily have to be political. For instance, a few puzzles back the answer was "Minnesota Twins" — not a political answer, unless you're thinking Mondale and Humphrey instead of Killebrew and Oliva.

And last week's puzzle wasn't political either.

The buttons from last week, in case you forgot:

Ben Cardin for Senate — the Maryland Democrat defeated Michael Steele in the 2006 campaign to succeed retiring Sen. Paul Sarbanes.

Roth for Governor — William Roth finished fourth in the 1974 Dem primary in California.

Liz for Chairman — thought to be a button for someone running for chair of the California Democratic Party.

Whopper Beats Big Mac — what can I say?

Anyway, when you add Ben + Roth + Liz + Berger, you get ...

Ben Roethlisberger, the quarterback of the Super Bowl-winning Pittsburgh Steelers! (Anu Devkota of Chesterfield, Mo., can't figure out why I have a Whopper/Big Mac button in my collection. Neither can I.)

Anyway, the winner, selected at random among the correct responders, is (drum roll) ... Ryan LaFountain of Athens, Ga. Ryan is now on the short list to be the next secretary of health and human services.

Wanna be alerted the moment a new ScuttleButton goes up on the site? Sign up on our mailing list at politicaljunkie@npr.org.

(And don't forget, the contest to name the next HHS secretary is still going on as well; click here for details and go to the bottom of the post.)

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