ScuttleButton Puzzle Winner: Noah Coolidge of Lexington, Mass.

A long, long time ago — back on Aug. 5 — I last presented on this blog a vertical display of campaign buttons.  The concept is called ScuttleButton.  If you can remember that far back, your task was to take one word or one concept per button, add 'em up, and arrive at a familiar saying or a name. (Seriously: a saying that people from Earth might be remotely familiar with.) Submit your answer and hope you're the person chosen at random.

Alas, with vacation intervening, that seems so long ago.  But that is the premise of ScuttleButton.

Oh wait, one more thing. You MUST include your name and city/state to be eligible.

Also, the answer does not necessarily have to be political. For instance, the answer to a puzzle awhile back was "Minnesota Twins" — not political at all, unless you're thinking Mondale and Humphrey instead of Killebrew and Oliva.

Here is that last puzzle, in case you forgot:

I (heart) El Al — the Israeli airline.

A Man You Can Trust / Stuart Ain for Congress — The Republican candidate in New York's 6th District in 1978, he lost to Democratic incumbent Lester Wolff.

A — The symbol of the Anarchist Party.  (Boy, I sure overuse this button, don't I?)

K / Kennedy In 1980 — Sen. Ted Kennedy challenged President Jimmy Carter for the Democratic presidential nomination that year.

Ginn for Governor — Rep. Ronald "Bo" Ginn finished first in the 1982 Democratic primary for governor of Georgia but lost the runoff to Joe Frank Harris.

So, when you add El + Ain + A + K + Ginn, you might end up with ...

Elena Kagan.  She won confirmation to something important earlier this month.

This week's winner, chosen completely at random, is (drum roll) ... Noah Coolidge of Lexington, Mass.

Wanna be alerted the moment a new ScuttleButton puzzle goes up on the site? (How can you NOT???) Sign up for my mailing list at politicaljunkie@npr.org.

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