Politics: Issues Politics: Issues

Sen. Bill Cassidy, R-La., continues to tweak the health care bill he cosponsors in an effort to persuade reluctant senators to back it. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Republicans Left With 1 Week To Pass Health Care Bill Without Democratic Votes

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A Look At How The Graham-Cassidy Bill Would Affect Kansas

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Two-year-old Robbie Klein of West Roxbury, Mass., has hemophilia, a medical condition that interferes with his blood's ability to clot normally. His parents, both teachers, worry that his condition could make it hard for them to get insurance to cover his expensive medications if the law changes. Jesse Costa/Jesse Costa/WBUR hide caption

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Jesse Costa/Jesse Costa/WBUR

Charlene Yurgaitis gets health insurance through Medicaid in Pennsylvania. It covers the counseling and medication she and her doctors say she needs to recover from her opioid addiction. Ben Allen/WITF hide caption

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Ben Allen/WITF

Protesters rally against Medicaid cuts in front of the U.S. Capitol in June. Medicaid is the nation's largest health insurance program, covering 74 million people — more than 1 in 5 Americans. Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call/Getty Images hide caption

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Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call/Getty Images

Sen. Bernie Sanders' speech is the type of move that a potential presidential candidate would make in the off years leading up to an election. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Sen. Lindsey Graham, second from left, speaks as Sen. John Barrasso, from left, Sen. Bill Cassidy, Sen. John Thune and Senate Majority Leader Sen. Mitch McConnell listen during a news briefing Tuesday. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

Equifax spent over $1 million last year on lobbying efforts, according to data compiled by the Center for Responsive Politics. Mike Stewart/AP hide caption

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Mike Stewart/AP

Equifax Breach Puts Credit Bureaus' Oversight In Question

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Senate Republicans Up Against Sept. 30 Deadline For Last Effort To Replace Obamacare

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Jimmy Kimmel Says Sen. Cassidy Fell Short Of Standard For Obamacare Repeal

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Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C. (right), and Rick Santorum, former senator from Pennsylvania, listen during a health reform news conference on Capitol Hill last week. Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg/Getty Images hide caption

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A strengthening global economy is among the most important forces putting downward pressure on the dollar. agcuesta/Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

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agcuesta/Getty Images/iStockphoto

The Dollar Is Weaker, But That Might Not Be A Bad Thing

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President Trump meets with Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., and other congressional leaders in the Oval Office. According to The Washington Post, Trump and Schumer have agreed to work on a plan to eliminate the debt ceiling. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP

Governors from left; Bill Haslam of Tennessee, Steve Bullock of Montana, Charlie Baker of Massachusetts, John Hickenlooper of Colorado and Gary Herbert of Utah all testified Thursday about ways t improve the ACA. Jose Luis Magana/AP hide caption

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Jose Luis Magana/AP

Governors Sound Off On How To Fix Health Insurance

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Faride Cuevas, a participant in the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, or DACA, program, talks to reporters Wednesday in Seattle as Washington Attorney General Bob Ferguson and other DACA participants look on. Ted S. Warren/AP hide caption

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Ted S. Warren/AP

The Children's Health Insurance Program relies on money from state and federal governments to help subsidize the cost of medical care for some kids not poor enough to qualify for Medicaid. Rebecca Nelson/Getty Images hide caption

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How Life Could Change For DACA 'DREAMers' Under Trump Administration

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Republican Sen. Lamar Alexander chairs the Senate's Health, Education, Labor and Pensions committee; Sen. Patty Murray is the committee's ranking Democrat. Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg/Getty hide caption

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