Sen. Charles Schumer of New York stands a podium March 3 as Senate Minority Leader Harry Reid of Nevada looks on. Reid is backing Schumer to be his replacement as Democratic leader. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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Senate Minority Leader Harry Reid of Nevada and Sen. Charles Schumer, D-N.Y. Reid said today that he won't seek re-election in 2016, adding he wants Schumer to succed him as the Democratic leader in the Senate. Molly Riley/AP hide caption

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Indiana Gov. Mike Pence holds a news conference at the Statehouse in Indianapolis, on Thursday, where he signed into law a bill that would allow business owners with strong religious convictions to refuse to provide services to same-sex couples. Michael Conroy/AP hide caption

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"Abraham Lincoln held this seat in Congress for one term but few faced as many defeats in his personal, business and public life as he did," Rep. Schock said on the House floor Thursday. Kris Connor/Getty Images hide caption

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Congress tries every year to plug a loophole that would otherwise result in a 21 percent cut in Medicare doctors' pay. But it doesn't exactly always tighten its belt in the process. Key Wilde/Getty Images hide caption

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In this Aug. 14, 2013 file photo, former Illinois Rep. Jesse Jackson Jr. and his wife, Sandra, arrive at federal court in Washington to learn their fates when a federal judge sentences the one-time power couple for misusing $750,000 in campaign money. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

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Maranda Brooks stands in January outside a payday loans business that she used to frequent. Troubled by consumer complaints and loopholes in state laws, federal regulators are proposing expansive, first-ever rules on payday lenders, aimed at helping cash-strapped borrowers from falling into a cycle of debt. Tony Dejak/AP hide caption

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If Reps. Nancy Pelosi and John Boehner win and their plan becomes law, it would kill what's known on Capitol Hill as the "doc fix." David McNew/Getty Images hide caption

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