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Steve Bannon arrives at a swearing-in ceremony of White House senior staff in the East Room of the White House on Jan. 22. Andrew Harrer/Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Harrer/Pool/Getty Images

Steve Bannon, Out As Chief White House Strategist, Heads Back To Breitbart

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Charities are canceling plans for fundraising events at President Trump's Mar-a-Lago Club. The cancellations come in the wake of his controversial comments about the events in Charlottesville, Va. Don Emmert/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Don Emmert/AFP/Getty Images

President John F. Kennedy makes a nationwide televised broadcast on civil rights in the White House, June 11, 1963. Americans often look to presidents for moral clarity in critical moments. Charles Gorry/AP hide caption

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Charles Gorry/AP

Fathers Of Our Country: How U.S. Presidents Exercised Moral Leadership In Crisis

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Liberty University President Jerry Falwell Jr. (right) praised President Trump for his "bold truthful statement" about Charlottesville. Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images

Trump's Evangelical Advisers Stand By Their Man

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Workers use a crane to lift the monument dedicated to former Chief Justice of the United States Roger Taney in Annapolis, Md., early Friday. The State House Trust voted Wednesday to remove the statue from its grounds. Jose Luis Magana/AP hide caption

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Jose Luis Magana/AP

Workers load a statue of Confederate Gens. Robert E. Lee and Thomas "Stonewall" Jackson on a flatbed truck in the early hours of Wednesday in Baltimore. A campaign to remove symbols of the Civil War-era, pro-slavery secessionist republic is gathering momentum across the United States. Alec MacGillis/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Alec MacGillis/AFP/Getty Images

In the American Prospect interview, White House chief strategist Steve Bannon described economic competition between the U.S. and China in apocalyptic terms. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

President Trump has said he is considering a pardon for former Maricopa County Sheriff Joe Arpaio, who was recently convicted on federal criminal contempt charges. Trump is holding a rally in Phoenix next Tuesday. Mary Altaffer/AP hide caption

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Mary Altaffer/AP

Army Chief of Staff Gen. Mark Milley wrote, "The Army doesn't tolerate racism, extremism, or hatred in our ranks. It's against our Values and everything we've stood for since 1775." Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Kyle Quinn, an assistant professor of biomedical engineering at the University of Arkansas, was wrongly identified on social media as a participant in a white supremacist march in Charlottesville, Va. Jennifer Mortensen hide caption

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Jennifer Mortensen

Kyle Quinn Hid At A Friend's House After Being Misidentified On Twitter As A Racist

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Faced with a string of resignations from his advisory panels, President Trump has disbanded two groups he had formed to provide policy and economic guidance. He's seen here after a news conference Tuesday. Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images

White supremacists descended on Charlottesville, Va., to protest the pending removal of the statue of Robert E. Lee in the city's Emancipation Park. Julia Rendleman/AP hide caption

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Julia Rendleman/AP

'We're Not Them' — Condemning Charlottesville And Condoning White Resentment

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