Race NPR stories on race and ethnicity. Commentary on race's effects on politics, culture, society. Subscribe to NPR podcasts and RSS feeds on race and ethnicity issues.

Workers use a crane to lift the monument dedicated to former Chief Justice of the United States Roger Taney in Annapolis, Md., early Friday. The State House Trust voted Wednesday to remove the statue from its grounds. Jose Luis Magana/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Jose Luis Magana/AP

Francine Anderson grew up in a small town in Virginia in the 1950s. She says that when she was 5 years old, she first realized that the color of her skin could put her in danger. Courtesy of StoryCorps hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of StoryCorps

After 60 Years, Girl's Experience At Whites-Only Gas Station Still Hurts

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/544264905/544365108" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

White supremacists descended on Charlottesville, Va., to protest the pending removal of the statue of Robert E. Lee in the city's Emancipation Park. Julia Rendleman/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Julia Rendleman/AP

'We're Not Them' — Condemning Charlottesville And Condoning White Resentment

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/542456259/543997993" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Workers load a statue of Confederate Gens. Robert E. Lee and Thomas "Stonewall" Jackson on a flatbed truck in the early hours of Wednesday in Baltimore. A campaign to remove symbols of the Civil War-era, pro-slavery secessionist republic is gathering momentum across the United States. Alec MacGillis/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Alec MacGillis/AFP/Getty Images

Neo-Nazis, white supremacists and other demonstrators encircle counterprotesters at the base of a statue of Thomas Jefferson on the University of Virginia campus in Charlottesville, Va., on Friday. NurPhoto/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
NurPhoto/Getty Images

Some Left-Wing Protesters Were Ready To Trade Blows In Charlottesville

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/544108578/544118573" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

GOP Response To Trump's Charlottesville Comments

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/544088137/544088138" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The Charlottesville, Virginia site where Heather Heyer was killed during a white nationalist rally last weekend. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Evan Vucci/AP

For Black Activists, Charlottesville Is Part Of A Long History Of Racial Strife

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/544081153/544081154" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Did Charlottesville Violence Shift How White Supremacists Operate?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/544081146/544081147" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Vice President Pence, speaking in Chile on Monday, said the "president has been clear on this tragedy and so have I" but did not address the president's reversal on the white nationalist protesters. Martin Bernett/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Martin Bernett/AFP/Getty Images

While doctors and nurses have an ethical duty to treat all patients, they are not immune to feelings of dread when it comes to patients who are hateful or belligerent. A well-known article from the 1970s spoke to this. Sally Elford/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Sally Elford/Getty Images

People attend the memorial service for Heather Heyer in Charlottesville, Va., on Wednesday. Heyer was killed on Saturday when a man, identified by police as a neo-Nazi supporter, drove his car into a crowd of people protesting against a white supremacist rally in Charlottesville. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

White nationalist Richard Spencer speaks to journalists Monday in Alexandria, Va., just days after three people died amid violence at rallies Spencer attended in Charlottesville, Va. Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images