There are so many opportunities to screw up pumpkin pie. But done right, it can win friends and influence people. Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

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Preeti Mistry's biriyani-stuffed pumpkin. Courtesy of Preeti Mistry hide caption

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Mama Stamberg's cranberry relish. Ariel Zambelich & Emily Bogle/NPR hide caption

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Kenji Lopez-Alt is managing culinary director of Serious Eats, author of the James Beard Award-nominated column "The Food Lab," and a columnist for Cooking Light. His first book is The Food Lab: Better Home Cooking Through Science. Robin Lubbock/WBUR hide caption

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Michael Solomonov describes Israeli-style hummus as "a marriage of chickpeas and tehina." Michael Persico/Houghton Mifflin Harcourt hide caption

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Former New York Times restaurant critic and Gourmet editor Ruth Reichl speaks in New York City in 2013. Neilson Barnard/Getty Images for The New York Times hide caption

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Most fruits and vegetables — particularly after being cut — store better in an airtight container, Gunders says. And it's best to store them in see-through containers so we don't forget about them. USDA hide caption

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After his mother-in-law's death, NPR's Marc Silver found her go-to cookbook, filled with her copious annotations to recipes. He used it to piece together her take on mandelbread, a Jewish version of biscotti, and other holiday favorites. Akash Ghai/NPR hide caption

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"Honey cake is considered the fruitcake of the kosher kitchen," jokes cookbook author Marcy Goldman. "The same resistance people may have to fruitcake, a lot of people have about honey cake." With her recipe — now the go-to recipe for thousands of families — Goldman modernizes this sweet taste of the past. Deena Prichep for NPR hide caption

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Chef Simon Hopkinson says mayonnaise is a total pleasure to make, but people are often frightened to try to make it themselves. Monika Evstatieva /NPR hide caption

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The Salt

No-Fear Homemade Mayonnaise: Better Than What's In The Jar

This week in our Do Try This At Home series: Making mayonnaise that's just as delicious as, if not better than, what comes out of the jar.

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Bren Herrera's vegetable broth comes in two varieties. You can either stop at the broth, or take it one step further by pureeing the used, cooked vegetables and mixing them in. Courtesy of Bren Herrera hide caption

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This Is Not A Parody: An NPR Story About Homemade Vegetable Broth

Yeah, we know, it sounds like a joke. But Cuban-born chef Bren Hererra's method totally won us over. Her secret? Don't throw anything out.

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A plate of huevos rancheros topped with a basted egg. Lydia Thompson/NPR hide caption

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Traditional recipes for duck confit, or confit de canard, can require dozens of steps to prepare. David Lebovitz's fake take cuts the steps down to five. Ed Anderson/Courtesy of Ten Speed Press hide caption

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An illustration from The Innocents Abroad by Mark Twain, published in 1897. Between the 1860s and 1920, when Prohibition went into effect, American bartending came into its own. Internet Archive Book Images/Flickr hide caption

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Smoked fish — a cooking method that uses the smoke of an indirect fire to lightly cook, flavor, and preserve the meat — is too often left to the professionals. But there are ways to do it indoors, at home and without much effort. Photo Illustration by Ryan Kellman and Emily Bogle/NPR hide caption

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Iced tea made from local berries is served with melon and squares of sweet sticky rice topped with fruits and nuts. The nuns eat these sweets on head-shaving day, to replenish their energy. Ari Shapiro/NPR hide caption

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