Favorite Ramadan drinks vary by country. In Jordan and Lebanon, tamer hindi, a tamarind-based beverage (seen above), is often offered alongside qamar al-deen, a thick apricot nectar. Amy E. Robertson for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Amy E. Robertson for NPR

Mike and Amy Mills' famous smoked chicken wings, as prepared in Ari Shapiro's backyard. Ari Shapiro/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Ari Shapiro/NPR

'Praise The Lard': A Barbecue Legend Shows Us How To Master Smoked Chicken Wings

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/529563192/530257576" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A typical masala soda shop in Mumbai. Flavors sold here range from traditional Indian ones with mango, pineapple and lemon, to more westernized flavors, like strawberry, kiwi and mojito. Leena Trivedi-Grenier for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Leena Trivedi-Grenier for NPR

The league-wide's secret recipe to success is out: The NBA and the PB&J go together like, well ... Sharon White/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Sharon White/Getty Images

The Pregame PB&J: How The Comfort Food Became The NBA's Recipe For Success

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/521256918/521474733" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Fanesca is made with grains and vegetables, and includes toppings such as peanuts, fried plantains, hard-boiled eggs and mini empanadas. Amy Robertson for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Amy Robertson for NPR

For Barrow Street Theatre, pie shells are baked and filled with the chicken and vegetables, cooked in a little white truffle butter, then sprinkled with truffle zest. Joan Marcus hide caption

toggle caption
Joan Marcus

In NYC, 'Sweeney Todd' Baker Serves Up Some Bloody Good Pies

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/516885309/517563249" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

'Princess Pamela's Soul Food Cookbook' Comes Back After Falling Out Of Print

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/516001594/516001595" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

D.C. chef Freddie Bitsoie shows off a sunchoke, a key ingredient in his signature clam soup, to NPR's Ailsa Chang and producer Ian Stewart. Jessica Smith/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Jessica Smith/NPR

To Appeal To A Modern Palate, Native Chef Gives Tradition A Little Twist

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/507663553/507760212" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The original recipe, which Susan still has on hand. Susan Stamberg/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Susan Stamberg/NPR

Behold: Susan Stamberg's Special Recipe For Caviar Pie

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/507542799/507670105" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Pastry chef Aggie Chin shares her recipes for a dinner party dessert, a citrus pavlova cake, and festive drink of pink champagne and a dollop of grapefruit sorbet. Ariel Zambelich/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Ariel Zambelich/NPR

Desserts To Help Ring In The New Year

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/506735911/506898945" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Cocktail Ideas To Put The Holiday Spirit Into Your Spirits

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/506849928/506849929" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

NPR Holiday Leftovers Presents: Lulu Garcia-Navarro's Monteria

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/506817102/506817105" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The Traditional Food Debate Rages On: Latkes Or Hamantaschen?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/506817111/506817146" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Jews commemorate Hanukkah by eating fried foods. For most American Jews, that means latkes — potato pancakes fried in oil. But other cultures toss different foods into pots of boiling oil. Take, for example, these fried and jam-filled doughnuts, called sufganiyot in Hebrew, on display at a bakery in Kadima in central Israel. David Silverman/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
David Silverman/Getty Images