With over 700 pages and 600 recipes, Mexico: The Cookbook, attempts to document exhaustively the country's varied regional cuisines. Recipes in the book include (from left): potato and chorizo tacos; divorced eggs with tomatillo sauce; and tikin-xik fish, a grouper dish from the Yucatan Peninsula. Courtesy of Fiamma Piacentini-Huff and Phaidon hide caption

itoggle caption Courtesy of Fiamma Piacentini-Huff and Phaidon

Baked Squash Kibbeh: Middle-Eastern kibbeh is a finely ground combination of beef or lamb, bulgur and onions either formed into balls and deep-fried or pressed into a pan and baked. For a vegetarian version of this flavorful dish, why not pair butternut squash with the warm spices? Steve Klise/Courtesy of America's Test Kitchen hide caption

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Amateur cook and writer Maureen Evans has perfected the art of tweeting a recipe in 140 characters or less. fot. Wojciech Zalewski/iStockphoto hide caption

itoggle caption fot. Wojciech Zalewski/iStockphoto

True cheddar cheese can take months — even years — to age. So Claudia Lucero created a faux-cheddar that can be made in very little time. fotolia hide caption

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Slovak language instructor Julia Vrablova sought out women who could teach her to make the dough for tahana strudla, which can be made with ground poppy seeds, apple or sour cherries. Courtesy of Sasa Woodruff hide caption

itoggle caption Courtesy of Sasa Woodruff

America's Test Kitchen recommends cooking meat, like this pan-seared steak, at a moderate temperature to seal in the juices. Carl Tremblay/Courtesy of America's Test Kitchen hide caption

itoggle caption Carl Tremblay/Courtesy of America's Test Kitchen

Sweet or salty? Historically among Eastern European Jews, how they liked their gefilte fish depended on where they lived. This divide created a strictly Jewish geography known as "the gefilte fish line." Claire Eggers/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Claire Eggers/NPR

Goodband compares these Knobbed Russets to shrunken heads. Others say potatoes or toads. They're all gnarled and warty and brown, but don't be intimidated: They taste great when ripe. They originated in Sussex, England, in 1819. Melissa Block/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Melissa Block/NPR