Explaining The Sizzling Sound Of Meteors

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Nancy Roach at a conference in 2016. She's long worked as a patient's advocate and recently teamed up with scientists to help improve the design of studies, as well as to improve clinical care. Andrew Wortmann/Courtesy of Fight Colorectal Cancer hide caption

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Andrew Wortmann/Courtesy of Fight Colorectal Cancer

Advice From Patients On A Study's Design Makes For Better Science

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Naomi Oreskes: Why Should We Believe In Science?

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Courtesy of TEDxSaltLakeCity

Kevin Jones: Can Embracing Uncertainty Lead To Better Medicine?

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Bumblebees have 100,000 times fewer neurons than humans do, but they can learn new skills quickly when there's a sweet reward at the end. Michael Durham/Minden Pictures/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael Durham/Minden Pictures/Getty Images

Could A Bumblebee Learn To Play Fetch? Probably

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Andie Vaught grasps a stress toy in the shape of a truck as she prepares to have blood drawn as part of a clinical trial for a Zika vaccine at the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Md., in November 2016. Allison Shelley/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Scientists rallied for evidence-based public policy outside the American Geophysical Union's fall meeting in San Francisco in December. Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP hide caption

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Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP

Should Scientists March? U.S. Researchers Still Debating Pros And Cons

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Anemic patients did not know about their condition during a testosterone trial. Renphoto/Getty Images hide caption

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Renphoto/Getty Images

Researchers Failed To Tell Testosterone Trial Patients They Were Anemic

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Does Studying Economics Make You Selfish?

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The program BAM (Becoming a Man) works with teenagers and uses cognitive behavior therapy to reduce violence in Chicago. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Maria Fabrizio for NPR

Can Poetry Keep You Young? Science Is Still Out, But The Heart Says Yes

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Brown recluse spiders are indeed reclusive, so bites are more apt to happen in places like closets or attics. Rosa Pineda/Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History/Flickr hide caption

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Rosa Pineda/Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History/Flickr

Beekeepers Glen Andresen and Tim Wessels are trying to breed a honey bee that is more resilient to colder climates. Kathryn Boyd-Batstone/Oregon Public Broadcasting hide caption

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Kathryn Boyd-Batstone/Oregon Public Broadcasting

Researchers Examine Race Factor In Car Crashes Involving Pedestrians

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A virtual reality installation allows visitors to experience a doll's perspective as she's poked and prodded by a lab assistant. Read the full story at KQED. Susana Bates for Drew Altizer Photography/Courtesy of the artist and Pace Gallery hide caption

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Susana Bates for Drew Altizer Photography/Courtesy of the artist and Pace Gallery

Don't Think Your Bias Can Boss You Around? David Byrne Says Think Again

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Editing human genes that would be passed on for generations could make sense if the diseases are serious and the right safeguards are in places, a scientific panel says. Claude Edelmann/Science Source hide caption

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Claude Edelmann/Science Source

Scientific Panel Says Editing Heritable Human Genes Could Be OK In The Future

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Tiny minerals in the clay of this jar hold information about the strength of the Earth's magnetic field at the time the jar was fired, thousands of years ago. Image courtesy of Oded Lipschits hide caption

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Image courtesy of Oded Lipschits

Once called the "Dutchmen" because of their large noses and large bellies, proboscis monkeys live only in Borneo. Ecosystems that have a lot of diverse animals, like this monkey, also tend to have a lot of diverse viruses. Charles Ryan hide caption

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Charles Ryan

Why Killer Viruses Are On The Rise

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Anchoveta are processed at a fish meal factory in Lima, Peru in 2009. Peru and Chile have the world's largest anchoveta fishery, making them the world's largest producers of fish for fishmeal. Ernesto Benavides/Getty Images hide caption

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Scientists have genetically engineered mice (but not this cute one) to be resistant to the addictive effects of cocaine. Getty Images hide caption

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A Brain Tweak Lets Mice Abstain From Cocaine

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Nicole Xu for NPR

Depression Strikes Today's Teen Girls Especially Hard

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