Brown recluse spiders are indeed reclusive, so bites are more apt to happen in places like closets or attics. Rosa Pineda/Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History/Flickr hide caption

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Rosa Pineda/Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History/Flickr

Beekeepers Glen Andresen and Tim Wessels are trying to breed a honey bee that is more resilient to colder climates. Kathryn Boyd-Batstone/Oregon Public Broadcasting hide caption

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Kathryn Boyd-Batstone/Oregon Public Broadcasting

Researchers Examine Race Factor In Car Crashes Involving Pedestrians

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A virtual reality installation allows visitors to experience a doll's perspective as she's poked and prodded by a lab assistant. Read the full story at KQED. Susana Bates for Drew Altizer Photography/Courtesy of the artist and Pace Gallery hide caption

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Susana Bates for Drew Altizer Photography/Courtesy of the artist and Pace Gallery

Don't Think Your Bias Can Boss You Around? David Byrne Says Think Again

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Editing human genes that would be passed on for generations could make sense if the diseases are serious and the right safeguards are in places, a scientific panel says. Claude Edelmann/Science Source hide caption

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Claude Edelmann/Science Source

Scientific Panel Says Editing Heritable Human Genes Could Be OK In The Future

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Tiny minerals in the clay of this jar hold information about the strength of the Earth's magnetic field at the time the jar was fired, thousands of years ago. Image courtesy of Oded Lipschits hide caption

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Image courtesy of Oded Lipschits

Once called the "Dutchmen" because of their large noses and large bellies, proboscis monkeys live only in Borneo. Ecosystems that have a lot of diverse animals, like this monkey, also tend to have a lot of diverse viruses. Charles Ryan hide caption

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Charles Ryan

Why Killer Viruses Are On The Rise

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Anchoveta are processed at a fish meal factory in Lima, Peru in 2009. Peru and Chile have the world's largest anchoveta fishery, making them the world's largest producers of fish for fishmeal. Ernesto Benavides/Getty Images hide caption

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Ernesto Benavides/Getty Images

Scientists have genetically engineered mice (but not this cute one) to be resistant to the addictive effects of cocaine. Getty Images hide caption

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Getty Images

A Brain Tweak Lets Mice Abstain From Cocaine

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Nicole Xu for NPR

Depression Strikes Today's Teen Girls Especially Hard

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Fragments of jars that contained stolen scrolls, found in a cave in cliffs near the northwestern shore of the Dead Sea in Israel. Casey L. Olson and Oren Gutfeld/The Hebrew University of Jerusalem hide caption

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Casey L. Olson and Oren Gutfeld/The Hebrew University of Jerusalem

The hemoglobin A1C test for blood sugar, a standard assay for diabetes, may not perform as well in people with sickle cell trait, a study finds. fotostorm/Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

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fotostorm/Getty Images/iStockphoto

The A1C Blood Sugar Test May Be Less Accurate In African-Americans

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This wild hog from Hawaii was raised at the National Wildlife Research Center in Fort Collins, Colo. Feral pigs in the wild tend to eat anything containing a calorie — from rows of corn to sea turtle eggs, to baby deer and goats. Rae Ellen Bichell/NPR hide caption

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Rae Ellen Bichell/NPR

Scientists Get Down And Dirty With DNA To Track Wild Pigs

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Keith Negley for NPR

Prion Test For Rare, Fatal Brain Disease Helps Families Cope

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Heat and steam from your shower or shave can rob medicine of its potency long before the drug's expiration date. Angela Cappetta/Getty Images hide caption

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Angela Cappetta/Getty Images

When Old Medicine Goes Bad

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'Pretty Disgusting Snot-Like Spit' Lets Frogs Catch Their Prey

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