Bacteriophages, in red, look like tiny aliens, with big heads and skinny bodies. They use their "legs" to stick to and infect a bacterial cell, in blue. Biophoto Associates/Science Source hide caption

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Your Gut's Gone Viral, And That Might Be Good For Your Health

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Careful audits of a representative sampling of bills from 37 Medicare Advantage Programs in 2007 have revealed some consistent patterns in the way they overbill, a Center for Public Integrity investigation finds. Nick Shepherd/Ikon Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Researchers are recruiting volunteers to participate in a four-year study trial of cocoa extract. Half of the participants will take capsules containing about as much cocoa extract as you'd get from eating about 1,000 calories of dark chocolate. Dennis Gottlieb/Getty Images hide caption

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A Chocolate Pill? Scientists To Test Whether Cocoa Extract Boosts Health

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Ramen will buy anything from smuggled fruit to laundry services from fellow inmates, a study at one prison finds. It's not just that ramen is tasty: Prisoners say they're not getting enough food. DigiPub/Getty Images hide caption

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Lenroy Watt talks with residents of Miami's Little Haiti about Zika, leaving brochures in Creole about how to prevent the illness, as well as phone numbers for local mosquito control agencies and the county health department. Courtesy of Planned Parenthood hide caption

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Planned Parenthood Joins Campaign To Rid Miami Neighborhoods Of Zika

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These are insect cells infected with the Guaico Culex virus. The different colors denote cells infected with different pieces of the virus. Only the brown-colored cells are infectious, because they contain the complete virus. Michael Lindquist/Cell Press hide caption

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A pneumatic network, in red, is embedded within the octobot's entirely soft body and elastic arms, in blue. Ryan Truby, Michael Wehner, and Lori Sanders/Harvard University hide caption

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By testing tumors, researchers hoped to identify women who could avoid chemotherapy without increasing their risk of a cancer recurrence. Voisin/Phanie/Science Source hide caption

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Study Of Breast Cancer Treatment Reveals Paradox Of Precision Medicine

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Tropical Storm Colin brought big waves to Fort Myers Beach in Fort Myers, Fla., in early June. Given the threat of serious flooding, Gov. Rick Scott declared a state of emergency in the area. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Climate Change Complicates Predictions Of Damage From Big Surf

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A customer tries the Siri voice recognition function on an Apple iPhone 6 Plus in Hong Kong. Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Voice Recognition Software Finally Beats Humans At Typing, Study Finds

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Smartphones To Blame For Limp Handshakes

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Berkeley, Calif., passed the nation's first soda tax in 2014. According to a new study, the tax has succeeded in cutting consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages. But there's uncertainty about whether the effect will be permanent. Robert Galbraith/Reuters hide caption

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Berkeley's Soda Tax Appears To Cut Consumption Of Sugary Drinks

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Paleoartist Peter Schouten's reconstruction of Microleo attenboroughi prowling along the branches of rain forest trees in search of prey. Peter Schouten/Courtesy of the University of New South Wales hide caption

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Do You Read Terms Of Service Contracts? Not Many Do, Research Shows

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This Lawson convenience store in Kowaguchi, Japan, sells a selection of prepared meals and fresh vegetables and meats, along with products aimed at the elderly. Many of the store's older customers find it hard to get to the supermarket, the store's manager says. Ina Jaffe/NPR hide caption

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Beyond Slurpees: Many Japanese Mini-Marts Now Cater To Elders

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Dan Gilbert says we're not great at predicting how much we will enjoy an experience in part because we fail to consider all of the details. We think a visit to the dentist will be terrible — but we're forgetting about the free toothbrush, the nice chat with the dental hygienist, and the magazines in the waiting room. Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images hide caption

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You vs. Future You; Or Why We're Bad At Predicting Our Own Happiness

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A plane sprays pesticide over the Wynwood neighborhood of Miami on Aug. 6. That's just one way health officials are battling back Zika-carrying mosquitoes in the area. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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How Big, Really, Is The Zika Outbreak In Florida?

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Research Challenges Assumptions On Why Voters Support Trump

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Sea ice melts off the beach of Barrow, Alaska, where Operation IceBridge is based for its summer 2016 campaign. Kate Ramsayer/NASA hide caption

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As July's Record Heat Builds Through August, Arctic Ice Keeps Melting

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Research Examines If Surgery Delays Affect Patients' Health Outcome

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The condition known as hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, or HCM, is inherited and can be a killer. But some of the genetic mutations once thought linked to the illness are actually harmless, geneticists say. Afton Almaraz/Getty Images hide caption

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Study Of Sudden Cardiac Death Exposes Limits Of Genetic Testing

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